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  • #24482
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    The removable sections in your gunwales are indeed intended to hold some polystyrene blocks in place. It is important that you place those blocks again, because they are the last resort when one of the buoyancy compartments fails. GRP does not float! The foam will keep your boat afloat though you cant bail it anymore because the CB case remains submerged. And don’t think that it won’t happen to you, I have seen hatches fail on boats of some very experienced and well known wayfarer sailors within our community.

    The exact specifications of the foam blocks are found in the class rules:

    34.4 Positive buoyancy units of closed cell plastics foam. Shall be securely fixed within the hull of G.R.P. and composite boats, as follows (lift refers to buoyancy when submerged in fresh water):

    (b) [Mk II (except SD versions)]. One unit providing not less than 40.82 (90) lift in the forward compartment. Units providing a total lift of not less than 40.82 (90) under each side deck, aft of the main shrouds

    (c) Alternative for MK IA and MK II (except SD versions). One unit providing not less than 40.82 (90) lift in the forward compartment. Units providing a total of not less than 13.6 (30) beneath each side deck and two units providing a total of not less than 54.42 (120) lift in the aft compartment. The units shall be positioned according to the official drawing

    Note that you have two options to choose from. Also note that the lift is defined in kg (with lbs in brackets).

    By the way, lift in kilogram is the same as foam volume in litre because the specific mass of sweet water is 1 kg/l. Seawater is a bit heavier than sweet water, hence you will get a bit more lift at sea when using the sweet water volume.

     

    #24313
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Hi Dave,

    Yes, the tiller may loosen due to wear or perhaps by some displacement of the metal cap that sits on top of the rudder stock. When I suffered from this some years ago, I glued a piece of Formica to the bottom of the tiller, where it is flat.  Obviously you should ditch the tiller pin that is a real pain in the you know where, as far as tiller play is concerned. A piece of bungee cord should pull the tiller back and wedge it firmly in to the rudder stock. When the bungee cord is also connected to the rudder’s downhaul you kill two birds with one stone.

    Instead of Formica any other stiff, low wearing material should be OK. I would not choose something rubbery as I suspect it would wear quickly and you would still have some play due to the softness of the material. If the shape of the tillers end does not match the rudder stock at all, I would probably glue some hardwood to the flat bottom of the tiller and reshape it for a better fit.  I recon that is much easier to do than refitting the metal cap of the rudder stock, but that would be your last resort.

    Obviously you could also glue some Formica or hardwood to the top of the rudder stock after removing the metal cap. Though the effect would be the same it seems to me a more difficult solution than fixing the tiller. But there may be a situation where you would otherwise have to notch the top of the tiller and that wouldn’t look nice.  What ever you do, keep an eye on the tiller angle relative to the deck, a)  for comfort and b) to avoid having it kiss the aft hatch.

    Using tape or cling film is a quick and dirty temporary fix, it is not a good long term solution IMHO.

    #24209
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Before modifying it, test it. I don’t think so, but maybe it is OK.

    Edit: Aaahrg, no colouring! The words “test it”  above are a link to the buoyancy test page.

     

    #24208
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    With a risk of  repeating what others wrote:

    The mast heel setting is actually not a setting, it follows from other settings. What you want is maximum play from a straight mast to a bent mast. The mast bend is limited by the pivot pin and holes. The pin must be in while racing to ensure everyone has the same play. None racers sometimes avoid the issue and just take the pin out. With a 6 mm pin the maximum movement at the pivot pin is 20 mm. (The mast and tabernacle holes are 16 mm max. so max movement is (16-6)+(16-6)=20). What you do with the heel setting is make sure you have this maximum play available. Hence you should be looking at the pivot holes while changing the mast bend. The mast pin should move free regardless of the amount of mast bend. The problem is that the heel position it is not a fixed location. When the mast rake and/or spreader settings change the heel, or rather the pivot hole play, should be re-adjusted.

    As Dave wrote: Adjust the heel position with average tension on and pull the mast forward by hand if need be. Also have the boom installed including its kicker to change the mast bend with the kicker. This requires the mainsail or a topping lift to keep the boom in the sailing position. This is important because you need the forward force on the mast at the pivot pin and there will also be a pulling force on the mast top through the leech or topping lift.  The aim of the setup is to get as close to sailing conditions as possible.

    Instead of moving the heel pin forward to where you can’t insert it, you could also insert a hardwood block and/or some pennies, or what ever else you find in your shed. In my old boat I had a piece of copper water pipe in it.

    I make my own pins by sawing a piece SS rod to size and drilling two holes in it. That is how it’s done by the builders as well.

     

    #23600
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    If you take out the Hog or the thwart you may want to use some temporary bracing to ensure the hull keeps its shape. Any deformation of the hull may take the boat out of class. Once it is out of class you cannot participate in races at any level above Wednesday evening club races, and that means a loss of market value should you ever want to sell her. But I don’t want to scare you, replacing the CB case has been done many times before. It is very doable job but there are some precautions to think about.  But isn’t it a bit late in the season for such a job? Most of us have already, or will be launching our boats soon!

    AFAIK the Hog is the upper part of the keel, on the inside of the hull.
    In the old 17th Century wooden boats the timbers went in  between the keel and the hog.

    https://haddockboat.wordpress.com/category/english/diary/keel-hog-stem-and-sternpost/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinker_(boat_building)

    #23314
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Do not use prestretched rope, it is still too stretchy. You don’t want your set-up to change once you have it trimmed well. The only thing that can replace SS wire is Dyneema.

    #23081
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    May I suggest you use the search function of this forum and/or visit the Wayfarer Institute of Technology (WIT) on the website of the Canadian Wayfarers?

    There has been written so much about single handing and the various set-ups people use. Your question is just to broad to answer in a simple reply. But if you have specific questions I will be happy to answer them, if I can.

    #23080
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    A standard MKII does not invert easy.
    That is a privilege reserved for the double bottom, self draining (=wet) boats like the World, the MKII-SD and the MKIV versions.

    #23076
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    The deep rudder is supposed to work better in waves but I find it only to marginally better. The old style blade is a little more sensitive in the sense you need less rudder angle to achieve the same. The choice of rudder is the last thing to worry about IMHO. Far more important is that it has no play what-so-ever. The least bit of play will ruin that all important feeling for  the boat through the tiller.

    Use a rubber hinge on your joystick and not one of those mechanical things. Get rid of that fluffy rubber hand hold on the joystick. Use some duct tape or ‘tennis racket tape’ instead. Don’t use an adjustable tiller, they always loosen at the worst possible moment. Buy one that is too long and saw it back to the length you prefer. (Or  make your own joystick from a piece of Aluminium pipe, a rubber joystick hinge and some tape and save some money).

    Make sure the tiller wedges in to the rudder stock and get rid of the tiller pin (used on old boats). Use a bit of bungee to ensure the tiller is pulled in to the rudder stock at all times. Check the taper of the rudder stock and tiller. Add a small plastic wedge if the fit isn’t perfect.

    Make sure the rudder and the rudder stock are perfectly parallel.  The rudder is supposed to float up when the downhaul is released. I have added an uphaul so I can tighten the wing nut a bit more to make sure there is no play between the rudder and the rudder stock. Obviously it then does not float up by itself anymore hence the uphaul. Mind you, it still comes up when it hits something under water. In some cases you may want to add a filler piece between the rudder and the rudder stock, again to minimize play.

    Check your centre board, its position fore/aft,  its angle of dangle and depth. Find the limits as defined by the class rules and make use of it. Make sure the CB meets the maximum allowed sizes.  IMHO, a well set-up CB makes you point higher and that is a far more effective way to win races than the choice of rudder.

     

    #21839
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Closure strips are not only good for racing, for cruisers they do a pretty good job keeping debris out of the CB slot while beaching. And not even a cruiser would sail with two fingers in the water, which has the same effect on boat speed as a CB slot without closure strips.

     

    #21611
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Rain and sun has changed their design a few years ago. It took me some time to figure out what was going on. A small boom cradle was needed that lifts the boom end (and the cover) about 8 inches (need to check the exact dimensions though). With this arrangement the puddles at the rear are totally gone. But I store my boat exactly plumb so it  drains maximal through the bailers. If you put your boat bow  up you may not need this new cover design. The R&S web site does not show anything about this boom cradle, I suggest you discuss it with them.

    R&S do show a different cover design for a Wayfarer World and I suspect that a MK4 also needs a slightly different design too because she is wider than other Wayfarers due to the way the deck is glued to the hull. Also if you may have an optional rubbing strake that may have an effect on the width of the design.

    I think Cotton is not needed for a GRP boat but not everyone agrees on this. Cotton does leave a dryer boat but it does not last as long as PVC and is more expensive. My boat is downwind from an asphalt plant that produces tiny soot particles. They clean easy from a PVC cover with a sponge and soap. I doubt if I could clean a Cotton cover that easy, if at all.

    The above should give you the most important features to discuss with your sail/cover maker.  You should get five to ten years out of a PVC cover depending on usage and if she goes in to indoor winter storage. I am on my second R&S cover. The first one lasted about 8 years and my boat is in the dinghy park all year round.

    Like Peter I didn’t even bother to look at others besides Rain & Sun. Good design, good price, good customer experience.

     

    #21588
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    I don’t know the leaflet you are referring to, but the best few quid you can spent is ordering the Wayfarer Book through this web site. It is a book published by the Wayfarer association and written by Wayfarer sailors for Wayfarer sailors. It will answers most, if not all, questions you may have. (A nice Christmas present perhaps)?

    Another good source of information is the WIT (Wayfarer Institute of Technology), a Canadian web site that collects essays for you to download, written by Wayfarer sailors from all over the world. (Google will guide you there).

     

    #21476
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    If you search the forum for “forestay” you will find many threads on the subject. This is just one of them

    #21461
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    The problem with auto bailers is that due to the high pressure area leeward of the CB, the leeward bailer never works. But then again the windward bailer, supported by the low pressure area windward of the CB, does double the work. In other words, if you go the auto bailer route, you need a pair.

    And get some ‘Andersen Super Max‘ bailers, not that plastic rubbish Hartley has been using for a while.

    #21459
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    All you need to know is in the Class Rules & Measurement Forms.

    The extended top side of the boom (= the foot of the sail) should meet the upper edge of lower black band on the mast and the top of the main sail should stay below the upper black band on the mast. The same happens on the boom, the clew of your main should never be aft of the black band on the boom.  The latter black band is measured from the aft edge of the mast. The gooseneck size and position plays no role in the measurements.

    The sail dimensions are part of the rules and the forms as well but they are derived from the black band dimensions.

    The mast, boom and sail measurements are really easy to do but you could of course ask assistance from, a class measurer near you.

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 614 total)