LATEST NEWS: Forums Technical Wooden wayfarer centreboard casing

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  jhunneyball 7 months ago.

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  • #23585

    jhunneyball
    Participant

    Hello

    Can anyone give me some advice – I have a 1962 wooden wayfarer. Whilst getting it ready for sailing I have discovered the plywood on one side of the centreboard casing has rotted. The rot goes all the way through. I have looked through the ‘wooden wayfarer restoration manual’ that is posted on-line. This scared me when it listed centreboard casings problems as something that would require almost a total rebuild. While I am prepared to do that if that is what’s required, I would also quite like to go sailing this season! Is it possible to cut out and replace the affected areas of ply?

    Any advice gratefully appreciated

    Thanks

    Justin

    #23587

    john1162
    Participant

    To replace a centreboard case in a wooden wayfarer is indeed a major undertaking. I had to remove part of the keel to get at the screws that go through the hog and into the centreboard. The screws are mild steel and will probably be rusty. Once you have done that you may find, like me, that the centre thwart will not come right out so you have to wiggle the centreboard case out. Assuming you have cut the centreboard from the hog. This is not a quick fix. Expect to take a month of evenings.  Meanwhile how about putting a large patch over the offending rot until you have time to do a proper repair?

    #23588

    Web Team
    Keymaster

    Any chance of a photo, Justin? It might be of interest and of use to others with a similar problem.

    Good luck with your repair!

    #23599

    jhunneyball
    Participant

    Hi John

    Thanks for the reply. As far as I can tell so far it is only the plywood casing that has rotted. At the moment it looks like the structural timbers are okay. I will have a better idea tomorrow when I can get someone to help me turn it over and have a proper look. Which bit is the hog? Sorry – I’m not up to speed on all the names for the different bits!

    Here is a picture of it. The rot extends to the bottom of the ply sheet for about the fore half of the hole.

    Thanks

    Justin

    #23600

    Swiebertje
    Participant

    If you take out the Hog or the thwart you may want to use some temporary bracing to ensure the hull keeps its shape. Any deformation of the hull may take the boat out of class. Once it is out of class you cannot participate in races at any level above Wednesday evening club races, and that means a loss of market value should you ever want to sell her. But I don’t want to scare you, replacing the CB case has been done many times before. It is very doable job but there are some precautions to think about.  But isn’t it a bit late in the season for such a job? Most of us have already, or will be launching our boats soon!

    AFAIK the Hog is the upper part of the keel, on the inside of the hull.
    In the old 17th Century wooden boats the timbers went in  between the keel and the hog.

    https://haddockboat.wordpress.com/category/english/diary/keel-hog-stem-and-sternpost/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinker_(boat_building)

    #23653

    john1162
    Participant

    It looks to me like a temporary repair might be possible but you will have to cut a bit of your floorboard to fit.

    Clean off the varnish and paint then glue a length of wood over the gap and down onto where the floor board rests.

    Fix a temporary support for the floorboard and cut the floorboard to fit.

    Not elegant and certainly temporary but it would get you sailing.

     

    #23680

    jhunneyball
    Participant

    Thanks for all your replies.

    I think I am going to go for a proper repair rather than a bodge, even if it means I won’t be sailing for a while.

    I can see it will be helpful to brace the hull. I thought bolting a piece of wood through the sockets the rowlocks fit into would brace it in one direction for removing the thwart, but I can’t see an easy way of bracing against forward and backward motion.

    Also I am struggling to understand ‘remove part of the keel’ john. I thought the keel was the bit everything else is attached to when making a boat!

    Still gathering my courage to get started on this!

    Justin

    #23688

    john1162
    Participant

    If you look underneath your boat the keel is the length of timber in the middle.  It is about 3″wide and 3/4″ thick. Screws go through this, then the hog and then into the centreboard case. I would be surprised (pleased of course) if you can get the screws out without destroying part of the keel. The keel and hog sandwich the bottom panels of the hull.

    #23694

    jhunneyball
    Participant

    I think I’m finally getting my head around how it’s all put together and exactly what I need to do. Basically this…

    • remove thwart
    • unscrew screws attaching centreboard case to the kingposts of the mast tabernacle
    • unscrew (or more likely drill out) screws through keel & hog holding centerboard case from below
    • remove centreboard case as one unit (after hack sawing through the bond holding it to the hog)

    The floorboard supports are dovetailed into the centreboard case. I am guessing it would be easier to remove them with the centreboard case rather than leave them attached to the hull.

    Sounds easy! Have I got this about right?

    Thanks again for the advice.

    Justin

     

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