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  • #11203

    I’ve read Attention All Shipping and was left… well… with the impression that it was a bit hollow. There really isn’t all that much to it other than the premise of visiting the shipping forecast areas.

    A far better read, IMHO, in a similar vein, is Nick Thorpe’s book “adrift in Caledonia” in which he hitch hikes around Scotland on various vessels and meets quite a range of people on the way. Well worth a look.

    #11204
    Turtill
    Member

    @No Disgrace wrote:

    I’ve read Attention All Shipping and was left… well… with the impression that it was a bit hollow. There really isn’t all that much to it other than the premise of visiting the shipping forecast areas.

    A far better read, IMHO, in a similar vein, is Nick Thorpe’s book “adrift in Caledonia” in which he hitch hikes around Scotland on various vessels and meets quite a range of people on the way. Well worth a look.

    Many thanks. That goes on the list too.

    pete

    #11209

    Bit late, but anyway…

    Really enjoyed Lee Hughes book as he appeared mortal and happy to admit fright when biting off a big mouthful- like most of us. Wouldn’t have had the temerity to email him questioning his staying power as per your other correspondent as I haven’t personally cruised international waters solo for 1800 miles. This is fact not fiction!

    Jack de Crow – excellent.

    Also consider Red Admiral, A Voyage Around Cornwall by David Weston. If you like the idea of pushing a boat down a track on wheelbarrow wheels, combined with rounding Lands End, (without wheels) and a bit of the atmosphere of the Cornish art world, this is great. Also a beautifully produced little book with some stunning watercolours by the author – few are maritime though, but don’t email him to complain!
    Regards
    David

    #11212
    tempest51
    Member

    Now look here Smethurst, I do hope you’re not trying to be one of those keyboard warriors, so boring unless of course you’re Clint Eastwood. I gave an honest opinion, of course disagree if you wish, but the attempt to belittle was uncalled for. 😆

    #11213

    You emailed Lee to say you were cheated? Hmmm. You’re right, we all have our point of view. I will look out for the Contessa world trip book though.
    DS

    #11214
    tempest51
    Member

    Smethurst old bean, why read one of my recommendations, you might sever an annoying habit and agree with something I’ve written? The advertising blurb suggested Hughes sailed to New York, he even included a photo of the New York skyline in the book along with an email address for reader comments…which I made use of. So hmmm to you old stick.

    #11217
    Turtill
    Member

    Whoops. I think I have enough recommendations for now thanks chaps.

    pete

    #11255
    Turtill
    Member

    @Turtill wrote:

    Whoops. I think I have enough recommendations for now thanks chaps.

    pete

    I have read some of the books recommended here now. I couldn’t read Jack de Crow as the writing style drove me crackers. I am very absorbed by “Sailing just for fun” and I would like to try something similar one day but not on such a basic boat. I would be interested in a boat about 20′ but with a diesel engine to drive a generator and keep the cabin warm. A centre board is essential as a shallow draft is a requirement.

    Is there such a boat? This will not be a replacement for my wayfarer but it will need to be as transportable so I do not need a permanent mooring.

    pete

    #11256
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    I got a nice Christmas present, a book titled “Round the Frisian sea” by a Dutch writer and journalist Hans van der Smissen, who sailed thirty odd years on the North sea and the channel, but mainly on the “Frisian sea” with his Drascombe. The book has a number of amusing short stories with a common message; the closer to the water the better the sailing is. Or as Hans puts it; “the enjoyment seems to be inversely proportional to the size of the boat” .

    Would a Drascombe fit the bill Turtill? It is almost a dinghy right? It’s about 20 foot, has a centre board and a tiny cabin up front, just big enough for two to sleep in and is remarkably seaworthy.

    Here is another (Dutch) site with pictures of nice small boats (use Google translate if you must). The Dorestad raid is sort of a rally where boat builders and designers meet and raced simple boats. This encourages new ideas but it is also great fun. During the raid it is allowed to sail, row, scull, punt, tow, or anything else as long as it is human powered. No engines are allowed. The participants have, over the years, designed and build boats special for the event.

    Another boat you may like is the Light, a boat designed from the lines of a Wayfarer (taken from my boat to be exact), enlarged to 20 feet, a small cabin was added but it is still a centreboard boat.

    #11257
    Davdor7038
    Member

    Have you looked at the range of dinghies by Swallowboats in West Wales. http://www.swallowboats.com. Trailerable and stable in the water with waterballast, some withcabins and some without.

    #11259
    Turtill
    Member

    @Swiebertje wrote:

    I got a nice Christmas present, a book titled “Round the Frisian sea” by a Dutch writer and journalist Hans van der Smissen, who sailed thirty odd years on the North sea and the channel, but mainly on the “Frisian sea” with his Drascombe. The book has a number of amusing short stories with a common message; the closer to the water the better the sailing is. Or as Hans puts it; “the enjoyment seems to be inversely proportional to the size of the boat” .

    Would a Drascombe fit the bill Turtill? It is almost a dinghy right? It’s about 20 foot, has a centre board and a tiny cabin up front, just big enough for two to sleep in and is remarkably seaworthy.

    Here is another (Dutch) site with pictures of nice small boats (use Google translate if you must). The Dorestad raid is sort of a rally where boat builders and designers meet and raced simple boats. This encourages new ideas but it is also great fun. During the raid it is allowed to sail, row, scull, punt, tow, or anything else as long as it is human powered. No engines are allowed. The participants have, over the years, designed and build boats special for the event.

    Another boat you may like is the Light, a boat designed from the lines of a Wayfarer (taken from my boat to be exact), enlarged to 20 feet, a small cabin was added but it is still a centreboard boat.

    The Drascombe may fit the bill if I see one for sale locally. I am looking through the pages of the Drascombe site with interest.
    pete

    #11260
    Turtill
    Member

    @Davdor7038 wrote:

    Have you looked at the range of dinghies by Swallowboats in West Wales. http://www.swallowboats.com. Trailerable and stable in the water with waterballast, some withcabins and some without.

    That seems interesting if I see a secondhand one local to me. Thanks for your post.

    pete

    #11264

    Hi, Sorry if you’ve already reached the conclusion but the inboard diesel/generator/heater is going to be the big constraint. I can comment on some boats I’ve sailed that might be of interest. There are a few nice 20ft boats of the centre-plate, water ballast variety with an outboard in a cockpit well. I have good experience of a friend’s Hawk 20 – we have beached it and pottered through salt marshes. The cabin version has a pretty small cabin but it can sleep two 6 footers. There are similar boats with a smaller cockpit and slightly larger cabin but the hawk sails well.

    The inboard diesel requirement probably means something heftier and traditional – Cornish Shrimpers (19ft plus a bowsprit) sometimes have an inboard Yanmar engine fitted. I have crewed in the outboard version and the cabin is big for a 19ft boat. Lovely gaff rigged boat, so nice easy short mast designed to drop into a crutch – but need deep pockets. I have sailed a Drascombe and they handle easily with a choice of sail plans. I’d go for the Drascombe or Hawk types, and use an outboard and portable heater (while awake only) with a CO detector, plus LED battery lighting. There are ways round other power requirements. Trouble is it only takes a relatively cheap little 4 to 8 hp outboard motor to push a 20 footer at hull speed, and you can lift it off for servicing. In the Hawk and others this can be tilted and the recess sealed with a hatch – no drag and allows beaching. Inboard diesels are super reliable and arguably the best by far for larger yachts but expensive to buy and fit, heavy with that water cooling and heating system and require a shaft through the hull and a prop generally permanently in the water. There are a few more options (and cheaper) if you go to 25ft, though the majority of these are still outboard propelled and it’s a LOT more boat to trail.

    Try the list on this page http://www.go-sail.co.uk/hometrailer

    Good luck with it.
    David

    #11265

    @Turtill wrote:

    @Turtill wrote:

    Whoops. I think I have enough recommendations for now thanks chaps.

    pete

    I have read some of the books recommended here now. I couldn’t read Jack de Crow as the writing style drove me crackers. I am very absorbed by “Sailing just for fun” and I would like to try something similar one day but not on such a basic boat. I would be interested in a boat about 20′ but with a diesel engine to drive a generator and keep the cabin warm. A centre board is essential as a shallow draft is a requirement.

    Is there such a boat? This will not be a replacement for my wayfarer but it will need to be as transportable so I do not need a permanent mooring.

    pete

    Have you come across Dylan Winter’s rather leisurely shallow-water circumnavigation of Britain? Might be up your street. Did most of it to date on a 19ft Mirror Offshore (shoal draft, diesel inboard) but recently changed to a slightly larger Hunter Minstrel with an outboard.

    See http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk

    Fantastic series of films, cannot recommend them highly enough. Most of them can be watched for free but the best bet is to send him £15 and get a DVD.

    #11266
    Turtill
    Member

    @Davdor7038 wrote:

    Have you looked at the range of dinghies by Swallowboats in West Wales. http://www.swallowboats.com. Trailerable and stable in the water with waterballast, some withcabins and some without.

    This is quite a site with many boats to look at thanks.

    pete

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