Latest News: Forums Technical Ways to attach/unattach the seats in a Mk 2 quickly

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #19889
    fundoctor
    Participant

    Farers

    In our Mk2 we have the usual wooden seats aft the thwart. These need to come out for sleeping and I am trying to find ways to make the transition to sleeping quarters quicker than it is at present. Presently we spend a while turning wingnuts on M6 bolts x4. I am wondering if there is a way to make this quicker – but am stuck for an alternative fixing. One easy thing I guess would be to shorten the bolts so they need only a couple of turns before the wing nut is off. The washers have a great tendency to fall off and down under the boards.

    Any ideas gratefully received

    Trevor

    WF 9002

    #19892
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Most cruising Wayfarerers leave the benches out altogether. Many a shed or garage is the proud home for a set of unused rear W benches. That said, I’ve slept in a Wayfarer with the benches in place, by simply swinging the support leg out of the way, and of course there are a number of ways to create a sleeping platform requiring the benches to be left in situ.

    That’s the beauty of the Wayfarer as a cruising boat – no two are the same.

    #19914
    fundoctor
    Participant

    Hi Dave – you an I in here again on our own! Well I have to say I like the benches. Great for storing stuff under and also s/t handy to steady oneself in a tack. I think I will shorten the bolts and mb take teh washers out as they are hassle……….

    Trev 🙂

    #19916
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    I know exactly what you mean – sometimes during a tack it seems a long way across the boat when everything is moving about.

    Shortening the bolts must be a good idea. You could Araldite the washers in place so that they still do their job but don’t fall underneath the (well-secured) floorboards.

    Hoping that if we keep using the forums others will join in…

    #19922
    waypad
    Participant

    Hello Trevor, I’ve been sailing my Mk2 without the seats, but have now decided to put them back in. Am thinking of sleeping on the seats rather than under them with a single slat to widen the area and which will clip under when not in use. Can you see any disadvantages in this setup ?

    Pete

     

    #19979
    fundoctor
    Participant

    Pete – I have thought of on-topping too, the main advantage being the avoiding of what we call “leg panic” when you get  yourself twisted up in your sleeping bag and suddenly feel an overwhelming urge to kick your legs free from the clutches of the thwart. This is espy bad on my boat as I store the engine under the front R seating and if sleeping x2 the leg-room is even more condensed.

    The disadvantages are that you end up with a fair bit of extra wood on the boat (espy if designing for x2) and the design itself might be tricky. It has to be reasonably wide (? twice bench width). Be great to see if anyone else has already done a good job. One material that would be the biz would be carbon-fibre. This is so rigid (and light) that you could put lathes (?sp) right across from side to side and have a double bed!

    Please update on plans!

    Trev

    #19980
    fundoctor
    Participant

    Early Warming of New Tent Design

    Dave and Pete

    You know the old WF rule of everything on board having at least two purposes? I am currently mid-design of a new tent. It is a conventional over-boom job except for one modification (?original) which is that the tarp is supported by the oars which are tied to the shrouds at the front and rest on props near the transom. This effective creates 2 foot high “walls” for the boom tent (with a false goose neck at 45cm above standard raising the boom).

    One thing I have not yet done is to design the actual cover – might do it in something cheap to get started and then if it is a goer – Ventile. The main point is to have something very fast to get up with more room than a basic boom tent.

    I am wondering if a bridle would be good or deck-eyes on the rubbing strip for actual attachment.

    Learning to use a sowing-machine today!

    Trev

    #19982
    fundoctor
    Participant

    Dave – daft wee question but how would you Araldite the wing-nut to the washer without fear of the AD getting down into the thread – the area of contact is not much – have you done this to effect?

    Trev

    #19993
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    With the oars suggestion you have unwittingly hit on an old idea, Trev. I guess the only reason it’s probably not more popular is that fewer people seem to carry oars these days. (Frame tents are still in wide use, but speed of deployment isn’t their greatest strength, nor is windage, which is doubly important for bench-top sleeping and for those concerned about motion/vision queasiness… Perhaps add at least one window for this reason?). You might find some photos in previous editions of the Wayfarer Book and perhaps W News too. (A bit off-topic, but for speed and space I really liked Ralph’s old tent which was erected as an overboom tent but you then inserted long sail battens, to push the sides out. The batten ends fitted into vertical slots at the gunwhales. Made by Rob Wagstaffe. Great tent, but not available now).

    Rob was also the first person I saw with a sleeping platform on the benches. If I remember correctly he carried a second set of bench tops which fitted alongside the usual ones, perhaps supported by his watertight plastic storage drums? There must have been battens involved too.  Again there must be photos, and if anyone remembers more clearly than I do, feel free to correct me. (I saw that Rob’s boat was up for sale recently…)

    As for the Araldite, I wasn’t suggesting sticking the washers to the wingnuts, (although you could) but rather to whichever surface the washers are there to protect. My thought was that it would save you from dropping the washers.

    I can’t help thinking that if you were to keep your engine on its mounting on/behind the transom you would have more room in the boat and the engine would be ready to use, with no risk of dropping it in the water or falling overboard yourself trying to attach it when needed, not to mention possible fuel leakage into the boat 🙂

    #19994
    waypad
    Participant

    Trevor, I have been working on my  seats this afternoon and have come up with an idea which may provide quick removal for floor sleeping below, which no doubt is preferable to on top.

    Replace the bolts with suitably rounded stainless location pins [there are several ways to hold these in position in the wooden seats, with corresponding female locaters [tophat shaped] fixed to the thwart. Fix  slightly larger  hatch cover type clips  under the thwart and thats it. What do you think !  Pete 7059

    #19995
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Genius solution! Any chance of a photo? (If you don’t have any way to upload it, let me know).

    #20006
    waypad
    Participant

    Not had chance to finalize the idea yet Dave, but as soon as I do I will let you know. As for photo’s, computers are not my forte so I will certainly need help there. Plus, I am at the moment welding up a trolly for my boat and so, am falling behind with things a little.  Pete

    #20007
    fundoctor
    Participant

    Yes photo please! I you email to Dave he seems to have a way of getting them on. Lots of little time-savings – together mean more time on the water sailing

    T 🙂

    #20019
    fundoctor
    Participant

    Pete – your people are impatient for further deets – off to the Hebs in a fortnight – Trev

    #20020
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    While Pete gets his welding done, here’s a diagram that John 1162 sent to me yesterday. He may wish to post some more details later, but I thought I would just begin to slake Trev’s thirst for knowledge with this morsel:-

    It’s a cross-section view showing how the rear bench can be fixed to the aft edge of the thwart using a simple turnbuckle. The screw is for adjustment of the turnbuckle if necessary, but in normal use no tools would be required.

    There is more than one way to solve most problems!

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