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Viewing 13 posts - 91 through 103 (of 103 total)
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  • #35789
    Steve W76
    Participant

    My previous posts are displayed in the wrong order, my fault I think as I posted successive ones before the previous had been authorised. So this time I’ll try one at a time..

    Roger, if you are referring to how many sheets for the deck, the answer is 2.

    Below are some of the potential layout solutions, I marked out the outline of the 2500 x 1200 mm sheets in string on the lawn and layed out my old decking as shown;

    They all vary slightly.

     

    If you are using standard marine ply you might get the rear hatch cover out of the 2 sheets as well.

    The issue I had was using Robbins tiger elite. Because it has “stripes” and therefore a visual flow, the actual layout gets a bit tougher as the side decks need to have the stripes flowing along the length of the boat. I couldn’t get the rear hatch out of the 2 sheets, particularly as the stripes would be running across the deck. I’ll work on a solution for that, but with 6mm Tiger elite working out at around £300 per sheet, I don’t think buying another sheet just for the hatch is going to be it.

    I spent quite a lot of time marking out the decks slightly oversized, much better than being undersized!

     

     

     

     

    #35798
    Steve W76
    Participant

    For thickener, it depends what I’m doing. Unthickened epoxy appears strongest, providing there are no voids in your joint. I tend to use 405 filleting blend for round the centreboard case and floors, where I have filleted the joins as well as gluing the mating surfaces, I used 407 low density for fairing my scarph joints on the outer hull, and good old microfibres 403 elsewhere. West systems have a guide on their site which shows the pros and cons of each one. I always “prime” both parts of wood before I apply the thickener to ensure good wood fibre penetration.

    #35814
    Roger
    Participant

    Hi Steve, what an inspired way of working out your plywood requirements.

    how did you resolve your hatch dilemma, are you able to make an invisible join. If not and you have to buy another sheet, you can use the remainder on your next project (restoration).

    Thanks for taking the time to answer.

    Roger

    #35846
    Steve W76
    Participant

    I’ve been attending other duties of late (Stag service work, Grandparenting etc) so haven’t had much time for W76. Will think through a solution for the aft hatch soon.

    #35943
    Roger
    Participant

    Hi Steve,

    I’ve just received my deck ply and would love some advice on cutting and jigsaw blades please. Do you have a favourite type of blade and set-up. Is it best to use a cutting up or cutting down blade?

    I need to make some space.

    Roger

     

     

    #35960
    Steve W76
    Participant

    Hi Roger, I tend to cut all of my panels oversize, then trim them once fitted to the boat. So I mark up everything 15mm too large, and rough cut, then plane and sand to finish to the existing edges. See my deck panels at the gunwale below.

    Likewise for the inner edges. I also finish the inner ply decking edges with either a radius or 45 degree chamfer so that the edges are not too sharp to lean against etc. I use a standard wood jigsaw blade, or tenon saw. the teeth should cut down into the finished side of the wood. Jigsaws make hard work of cutting straight lines, I tend to use a circular saw against a clamped straight edge if I need a straight cut. Again ensure the saw teeth cut downwards into your finished surface.

    As I had epoxied and painted the whole hull whilst still inverted, I have to cut back the paint where my rubbing strake is to be fitted, again see photo above.

    I have  been subjected to further delays thanks to the recent storms placing 40 feet of Poplar tree across my shed.

    On the plus side I picked up some 25mm sawn iroko to make my rubbing strakes from.

    A couple of minutes with the electric plane soon gave me something to saw down to fit later…

    More to follow once shed repairs are completed…..

    Steve

     

     

    #36084
    Roger
    Participant

    Hi Steve,

    Do you let your epoxy primed panels go off, before fitting them using fresh epoxy?

    Hope that makes sense.

    Regards Roger

     

     

     

     

    #36096
    Steve W76
    Participant

    Hi Roger, with the deck panels I applied 2 coats of epoxy to the whole of the underside leaving a couple of bare patches to ease handling. These unepoxied patches are outside of the deck pattern and got trimmed off after fixing (I found handling a completely epoxied panel/anything tends to make everything very slippery to handle, and the epoxy them transfers from your hands to everything else imaginable.) . The 2 coats are applied wet-ish, I also primed the receiving deck beams etc at the same time. I then applied thickened epoxy to all of the jointing surfaces, so the deck beams etc, as gravity holds it in place. I then assemble and clamp the whole lot. I checked the working/covering/drying times of the epoxy/thickener to ensure it would all work chemically. I spent forever making sure all the panels fitted, and arranging clamps, weights and other useful devices in handy places so that once the whole process is started there was no reason to stop/think/go looking for things/panic etc.

    The hull panels were loose fitted then clamped into place. I then applied masking tape from the inside of the hull so show where my “gluing” epoxy should be applied. Once screwed and epoxy had dried I would then “paint” the epoxy to the ftitted and trimmed panels.

    Hope that makes sense……

    #36171
    Roger
    Participant

    Very helpful Steve,

    My garage is too cold to do any gluing at the moment, most days between 4 and 8 degrees C.

    Which hardener did you use in your workshop, fast or slow?

    Roger

    #36174
    Steve W76
    Participant

    Hi Roger, I use fast mostly as it hardens quickly and also has a lower working temperature. (check the instructions). When doing larger pieces such as Foredeck panels, I use the slow hardener to give me a little more working time. The slow hardener has a minimum working temperature of about 18 Deg C from memory. I plan around the weather looking for warmer days, but I can raise the shed temperature above ambient when needed. I have left an electric radiator under the boat to keep it warm overnight before, but with the recent hike in energy costs I won’t be doing that any more….

    I suggest trying a small mix with offcuts to get an idea of working/hardening times for fast and slow.

     

    #36397
    Steve W76
    Participant

    So, been busy making bits of wood smaller again.

    Having cut the Iroko down, and profiled it according to the Class regs, I needed to glue it to the Ash fillet pieces I had made.

    So I made a jig to hold it all together, in the 6m ish lengths I needed. And also allowed me to make up 2 gunwale rubbing strakes side by side.

    It all seemed to work ok, and the jig allowed the laminating and scarfing all in one hit.

    Next up, a dry run to see how the bending process might work.

     

    A bit more pressure, and all is still good.

    All still good, so next a bit of screwing and gluing.

    I made my profile to match the original, new piece has the yellow end. The (top) original was fixed directly to the boat with no 6mm backing piece, and was also fitted “upside down” compared with figure 36 in the manual.

    #36403
    Steve W76
    Participant

    Sadly the original rear hatch frame pieces were not salvageable.

    However, a rummage in the local hardwood store’s scraps bin produced some very similar offcuts.

    Which are now screwed and glued in place.

     

    How scary is it cutting a massive lump of of your super new transom?….

    Never mind “measure twice”,  more like measure a dozen times, then walk away, come back then measure again. Then do the same on the inner side of the transom.

    #36410
    Jerome FR – W447
    Participant

    Fantastic job, as usual!

    Jérôme

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