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  • #4316
    Zindon
    Member

    Hello,

    I am the owner of W438 ‘Trumpeter’, a mk 1 wooden Wayfarer. She has not sailed for a long time, and I have been restoring her to a usable condition. However, I am new to boat ownership, so am struggling a little bit. I have bought the Wayfarer book, which is great, but doesn’t quite answer all my questions. I have stripped and revarnished the deck, repainted the hull and replaced some of the obviously worn rigging.

    Here are some pictures:

    This is the boat when I bought it. The foredeck appeared to have been sanded down.

    Another shot of the foredeck.

    Inside the front buoyancy tank – does that look concerning?

    As you can probably see from one of the earlier pictures, the rear buoyancy tank is not accessible, as the section where the hatch fits was removed with a solid piece of wood. I have the original hatch; the previous owner said I could cut a hole and restore the hatch if required. I am a bit loath to cut a hole in my boat – any thoughts on this? He said this had been done to avoid leaks.

    This brings me to the bungs:

    As you can see from the above, the rear bungs had been filled in and painted over. I scraped this paint off and picked out the filler, thinking I could get new bungs. I have been utterly unable to find anywhere who can supply the brass bungs as used on this boat. I bought some new plastic dinghy bungs, but on attempting to unscrew the old bungs from the transom the screws just disintegrate. I have restored to resealing the holes for the moment. Any thoughts on the best way to proceed with this?

    Also you can see from this picture, the rudder pintle was not attached. The previous owner kindly gave me some screws to attach it – however he neglected to tell me the remnants of the old screws were still in the transom. I had to carefully drill them out.

    This bit on the hull appears to be seperating. On the other side, it’s been taped up with a sort of fabric tape. Should I be worried about this?

    I understand this is called the tabernacle. As you can see, it’s a bit rotten. In fact, when I went to test rig the boat, the act of pushing the mast into here actually caused the lower half on the left side to completely fall out. The mast still seems secure, but I would like to fix this. Is this potentially a DIY job with some marine ply?

    The boat has taken a little damage at the front where it’s rubbed on the winch. Is there a standard way of avoiding this?

    The boat number carved into the wood.

    The trailer has seen better days – I only spotted this after I’d towed it from Norfolk to Cornwall. Clearly this needs a new piece of box steel. This might sound a daft question but how should I get the boat off the trailer in order to fix the trailer? Without actually putting it in the water?

    How she looks with new paint and varnish.

    I have a number of rigging questions – this boat is nothing like everything I have sailed before. Whilst I learned on a Wayfarer, it was a World with very different fittings etc. I am now going to ask some possibly daft questions. Apologies in advance.

    Forestay – the wire part of the forestay is not enough to reach the bow. There is a rope attached to it which makes it long enough. This helps when raising the mast (which is very difficult on my own – is there a trick to this?) Is this right? Basically it means if the mast is up without a foresail attached so you pull on the jib halyard, the mast is slightly dubiously held up by a this wire/rope combination.

    Cleats – These two cleats are the only ones at this part of the boat. I’m used to every line having it’s own jam cleat. I am alright to use these two old-fashioned cleats for main and jib halyard, kicker, and downhaul?

    Downhaul – In the picture you can see the yellow line (which I bought as the boat didn’t come with one). The sail has a little pulley on it for the downhaul – my question is, where does it go in the boat? In the picture, I have tied it onto the little metal hoop attached to the wooden block below the mast. I was thinking I could then pull on it downwards, tensioning the luff, and then cleat it off on one of the two cleats. Is this correct?

    Outhaul – this is where I am completely stumped. See below pictures of the boom:

    Inboard end

    Outboard end on

    Outboard end from above

    Looking towards outboard end

    My research indicates this is a ‘E’ section boom, and that Proctor Spars is now part of Selden. I bought a line to use as an outhaul, but I have no idea where to use it. As you can see from the picture about, there is a jam cleat about halfway along the boom, so I am assuming that is for the outhaul. However there is no pulley on the end of the boom. The third picture above shows that there used to be something attached to the boom at the outboard end that has rusted off – was this a pulley? If so, where can I get a replacement? I haven’t been able to find spares for E section booms.

    Or do I just loop it round the lug, as in this picture:

    This doesn’t look right to me. Is it?

    One final question – no battens came with my boat – I bought some but the lower ones are about 3 cm too long. They are Aquabatten tapered battens – am I alright to shorten them with a hacksaw and replace the end cap? Presumably I shorten them at the thin end?

    Sorry for all the questions and the lack of knowledge of all the correct terminology. Please correct me as appropriate.

    Any help will be gratefully received.

    Thanks,

    Oliver

    #10103
    Bob Harland
    Participant

    Oliver, in case you have not found it already the WIC have some useful information on restoring wooden boats;
    http://www.wayfarer-international.org/WIT/maint.repair.ref/woodie.restoration/W_restore_index.html
    you may find the techniques used help with your repairs.

    I have given answers on some of your questions below – hope they help.

    @Zindon wrote:

    Hello,

    As you can probably see from one of the earlier pictures, the rear buoyancy tank is not accessible, as the section where the hatch fits was removed with a solid piece of wood. I have the original hatch; the previous owner said I could cut a hole and restore the hatch if required. I am a bit loath to cut a hole in my boat – any thoughts on this? He said this had been done to avoid leaks.

    If you don’t need the storage space then ok – but I think you do need some bungs. If any water is getting in then it is vital that it is drained out.

    The boat has taken a little damage at the front where it’s rubbed on the winch. Is there a standard way of avoiding this?

    I would avoid using a winch – it puts a lot of strain onto a single point, not a good thing on an old boat. A rubber snubber instead.

    The trailer has seen better days – I only spotted this after I’d towed it from Norfolk to Cornwall. Clearly this needs a new piece of box steel. This might sound a daft question but how should I get the boat off the trailer in order to fix the trailer? Without actually putting it in the water?

    With your trailer I think you need to support the transom – eg on a workbench – then one person lifts the boat at the bow, another person slides the trailer out. If you have more people then it is easier!

    Forestay – the wire part of the forestay is not enough to reach the bow. There is a rope attached to it which makes it long enough. This helps when raising the mast (which is very difficult on my own – is there a trick to this?) Is this right? Basically it means if the mast is up without a foresail attached so you pull on the jib halyard, the mast is slightly dubiously held up by a this wire/rope combination.

    This is the normal method – the rope tail should be long enough to make a few turns and hence is plenty strong enough. Your wire forestay does look a few inches short though. Raising the mast is done by hand – from within the boat. Only use the forestay once you have the mast in position.

    Cleats – These two cleats are the only ones at this part of the boat. I’m used to every line having it’s own jam cleat. I am alright to use these two old-fashioned cleats for main and jib halyard, kicker, and downhaul?

    It looks like you have a fairly modern mast – if you don’t have cleats on the mast then fit some.

    Outhaul – this is where I am completely stumped. See below pictures of the boom:

    It should be possible to use a thin lanyard and take a few turns around the “horns” or lug at the end of the boom.
    This would be a fixed outhaul, once set you could not adjust it underway. This was a simple and common method.
    If you want to be able to adjust it then some mods are required. There some posts on the forum about this.

    One final question – no battens came with my boat – I bought some but the lower ones are about 3 cm too long. They are Aquabatten tapered battens – am I alright to shorten them with a hacksaw and replace the end cap? Presumably I shorten them at the thin end?

    Yes – that should be fine.

    #10105

    @Zindon wrote:

    Also you can see from this picture, the rudder pintle was not attached. The previous owner kindly gave me some screws to attach it – however he neglected to tell me the remnants of the old screws were still in the transom. I had to carefully drill them out.

    On both my Wayfarers the rudder fittings have been through-bolted. If I were you I would open up the rear hatch to allow access inside the buoyancy compartment, after all you will be more confident once you have seen what’s hiding inside. This will allow you to inspect the piece of wood receiving the screws, or preferably though-bolt the rudder fittings instead.
    You could probably achieve this by installing a small inspection hatch rather than reinstating the large original aft hatch which can be difficult to seal up again.

    This bit on the hull appears to be seperating. On the other side, it’s been taped up with a sort of fabric tape. Should I be worried about this?

    I think your picture shows a bilge runner. I presume the fabric tape is glass cloth? That would be a fairly strong way of mending this area, although you should use epoxy resin with it, not polyester, for this job. Alternatively you could use some sort of thickened epoxy to fill in the gap, but that might not be flexible enough.

    I understand this is called the tabernacle. As you can see, it’s a bit rotten. In fact, when I went to test rig the boat, the act of pushing the mast into here actually caused the lower half on the left side to completely fall out. The mast still seems secure, but I would like to fix this. Is this potentially a DIY job with some marine ply?

    I thnk it’s more common for the tabernacle to be made from mahogany- I might be wary of using ply for this job.

    The boat has taken a little damage at the front where it’s rubbed on the winch. Is there a standard way of avoiding this?

    Usually a rubber snubbing block would be fitted to the trailer to prevent contact with the winch.

    This might sound a daft question but how should I get the boat off the trailer in order to fix the trailer? Without actually putting it in the water?

    It is almost completely impossible to do this on your own without damaging yourself or your boat! I have wasted too much time trying to do it that way. If you have two or three helpers it is pretty easy. Support the aft end of the boat on something sturdy (piles of tyres, stack of palletes, etc), then your squad of helpers lifts the bow, and one person pulls the trailer free from underneath.

    I have a number of rigging questions – this boat is nothing like everything I have sailed before. Whilst I learned on a Wayfarer, it was a World with very different fittings etc. I am now going to ask some possibly daft questions. Apologies in advance.

    There’s more than one way to skin a cat 🙂 I have sailed on a few Wayfarers and they have all been rigged in different ways. You just need to find a way that works for you. Often, simpler is better. My first Wayfarer had split controls and all manner of ways of controlling sail shape; but as I am not a racer I now rig the boat for simplicity and ease of use instead.

    Forestay – the wire part of the forestay is not enough to reach the bow. There is a rope attached to it which makes it long enough. This helps when raising the mast (which is very difficult on my own – is there a trick to this?) Is this right? Basically it means if the mast is up without a foresail attached so you pull on the jib halyard, the mast is slightly dubiously held up by a this wire/rope combination.

    You can quite cheaply (about £10) replace the forestay if you have doubts about it. But it needs to be a little short of the bow so that the piece of rope can be used to create a lanyard, allowing you to tension the rig a little. If your jib halyard does not have a lever or some other system to achieve high tension, you probably would want a fairly taut forestay so a lanyard would be essential.

    Cleats – These two cleats are the only ones at this part of the boat. I’m used to every line having it’s own jam cleat. I am alright to use these two old-fashioned cleats for main and jib halyard, kicker, and downhaul?

    It’s fairly cheap and easy to add some more cleats. I have seen cleats added to the tabernacle, the centreboard casing, the thwart, and the mast, so plenty of options depednign on how you prefer to lead the lines. Personally I think cleats on the mast are the simplest and strongest way of doing things.

    Outhaul – this is where I am completely stumped…. there is a jam cleat about halfway along the boom, so I am assuming that is for the outhaul. However there is no pulley on the end of the boom. The third picture above shows that there used to be something attached to the boom at the outboard end that has rusted off – was this a pulley? If so, where can I get a replacement?

    Sometimes the pulleys seize up or break off completely (this happened to my old round section boom). I imagine you could drill a hole and fit a shackle, allowing a new block to be installed (this is what I did). Or you could keep things simple and just lash up the outhaul, and accept that you will not be able to change its tension whilst underway- unless you are racing I doubt you will find any disadvantage.

    Best of luck with your boat 🙂

    #10106
    Zindon
    Member

    Bob, No Disgrace,

    Many thanks to you both for your help.

    I have been reading the Wayfarer International site, and have come across this picture:

    (on this page: http://www.wayfarer-international.org/wit/cruise.daysail/cruisetips/phillips04.htm

    This appears to be a product similar to this:

    http://www.sailboats.co.uk/Catalogue~Rwo_Fork__Fork_Rig_Screw_140200mm~p_R9010~c4806.html. I have no lever or other device for creating a large amount of tension on the jib/genoa halyard, so would a rigging screw be suitable?

    I will be purchasing some cleats to attach to the mast. I do not intend to race the Wayfarer, so have no huge desire to be able to alter sail shape on the go, so the simple solution for the outhaul sounds fine.

    No doubt I will have many more questions once the boat is on the water.

    #10107
    Bob Harland
    Participant

    I have seen bottle screws used on Wayfarer forestays. These days they are not common – that’s probably because most people tension the rig with the jib halyard.
    In the past the jib was usually hanked to the forestay (i.e. piston hanks or plastic clips along the luff of the jib). So as long as there was good tension in the forestay it was not necessary to achieve any great tension on the jib halyard. The jib halyard could be hauled up by hand and tied off on a simple cleat.
    If your jib is hanked to the forestay then a bottle screw would be fine. If not the jib luff will still sag once the wind pipes up.

    You might not be too bothered about this. We have an old club wayfarer with a plain rope halyard and a bit of swigging on the forestay allows a reasonable tension on the jib halyard.

    Also consider how good the stem fastenings are – before applying a lot of force!

    hope that helps
    bob

    #10108
    westwoop
    Member

    Hi Folks,

    Firstly, wow – that looks like a bit of work, but worth it I am sure.

    I have shackled the forestay directly to the bow fixing, although I will admit it was quite cosy! I think I might take a look at moving it over to something less tough, just in case tension is too high. Anyone care to suggest how tight it should be? Is there a way to measure it given it is, currently, a fixed length which seems to be about the right length?

    Peter.

    #10110

    The forestay that was on my boat when I got her was, like yours, just about long enough to shackle to the bow.
    However this left the rig very slack. Yet somehow it took all of my strength to pull the forestay down to the bow when raising the mast, which made it a real pain to set up.
    The answer to both problems was to get a new, shorter, forestay (£10) and a couple of feet of 2.5mm dyneema to rig as a lanyard.

    Of course you could always check the shroud adjusters too.

    #10135
    admin
    Member

    Oliver, it’s funny how these things come all at once, I spent most of saturday with a newbie Enterprise and a Wayfarer owner attending to just these sort of issues.

    Firstly the forestay performs no useful purpose other than to hold the mast up in the boat-park, in fact I am thinking about replacing mine with a length of Dyneema which I will detach at the bow fitting once the genoa is up and fastened, because it is the wire halyard in the Genoa or Jib that tensions the rig, not the forestay. So, as others have said before, a short forestay combined with a lanyard made of a metre or so of 2mm rope is fine.

    I notice that you do not have the means to tension the rig by pulling the Genoa halyard tight, some have a Highfield lever to achieve this, I have a cascade system on mine to exert the not inconsiderable tension on the halyard necessary to get the overall rig tensioned up to the figures in the Wayfarer Book. One of the Enterprise owners I was talking to only had a rope halyard for his jib and I have given him my old Highfield and pointed him towards a rigger who advertises on eBay who can make up a halyard for about £20.

    The outhaul arrangement again is exactly as presented by my Enterprise friends at the weekend, even down to the funny ears on the end-plate of the boom. My advice (and I am sure there are other different, but just as valid pieces of advice to be had), would be to self-tapping screw or pop-rivet a lacing eye onto the starboard side of your boom just clear of the slot somewhere near the end of the boom (doesn’t really matter how far forward from the end) and a lightweight cheek block on the port side side close to the end. Get a pulley block with a hook attached which will hook into the cringle on the clew of the sail. The rope you show in your photograph should be tied to the lacing eye, pass forward around the hook-block (which will be hooked onto the back of the sail), back through the cheek-block then all the way forward to the tube-cleat you have on the port side of the boom. This cleat should be near the front so that the crew can get at it and tighten or release as necessary. Some people skip the hook-block and simply pass the rope through the sail cringle, but the pulley reduces friction and means you can leave the outhaul on the boom when you take the mainsail off.

    Nice restoration job BTW!

    When fixing stainless steel to aluminium, use an anti-corrosion gel to limit corrosion between dissimilar metals.

    Have fun.

    Mike

    #10138
    tempest51
    Member

    Mike,

    Don’t detach the Dyneema once the Genoa is rigged, just in case the wire luff or something else snaps, always have a safety device in place. In fact I use a Helyar reefing system that is tensioned by a Highfield lever, but I also have a Dyneema auxiliary hand-tensioned as hard as possible as well as a short piece of wire just in case everything goes pear-shaped.

    #10139
    admin
    Member

    Wise words, Tempest51 but my shrouds don’t have a standby in place and they could give way as well. On a Laser 2000 it is common practice (at least amongst the L2ks I know) to release the forestay from the bow area and take it back to the mast once the genoa is rigged. However I have ordered my roller furling today which comes with a sprongy crane thingy to hold the forestay out of the way, I will see how well it works before I try removing it although I will change it to Dyneema to make it easier to handle when off the boat.

    Incidentally Oliver I am sorry, I see I got it a bit wrong in my previous post, the lacing eye should be attached to the boom near the outboard end as the rope has to pass forward to the clew of the sail. Furthermore the genoa halyard that the rigger can make up for you is a combination of stainless steel and rope, if that was not obvious.

    Mike

    #10140
    Davdor7038
    Member

    Oliver

    What some cruisers have done is to lengthen the forestay rope, lead it around a small block attached to the stemhead fitting and back to a cleat on the foredeck inside the splash guard. This allows you to raise the mast from within the cockpit. The procedure would then be; Raise the mast using the extended forestay rope, tension the foresail halyard and then retighten the forestay to tack up any slack. This means that if, for any reason, you have to drop the foresail or the halyard/luff wire snaps, your mast will remain upright with reasonable tension on the forestay. Good restoration on your boat, by the way. congrats. Regards, Dave Doran.

    #10182
    annabelbowker
    Participant

    Hi, for 3 years I have been the proud owner of wayfarer 794, wooden, Mk 1. Here are some thoughts on some of your questions:
    Winch, personally I use a launching trailer, I’m not sure how you launch from a road trailer without getting your wheel bearings wet, and so I don’t use a winch, but with your system I would use a bow fender to protect the bow.
    Bow buoyancy tank: Is the wood rotten? If so it needs digging out and replacing with fibreglass, West Epoxy is the recommended type. If not, clean it, prime it and paint it to protect it.
    Hatch: I cruise my boat so the aft hatch is essential for storing gear, but for you it may be better to get on the water before worrying about this. To avoid the hatch cover coming off, I secure mine with M8 bolts sticking upwards and dome nuts which I remove to remove the hatch. My aft locker leaks round the edges of the bulkheads, I think the drainage holes are helpful in getting the locker dry although I also have a mirror and its buoyancy tanks are impossible to open up properly.
    The way I have got my boat off the trailer on dry land is with the help of 6 burley guys, however, we got it on it’s side once by grabbing the main halliard and pulling sideways. The boat fell off the trailer and onto some tyres.
    I raise my mast on my own by standing in the boat, pushing it up then pulling on the jib halliard, with the jib attached. The jib acts as a forestay. When the mast is up and jib halliard is secured I put the proper forestay on. As you say it is wire with line at the end, this goes round the fitting on the bow and through the forestay wire loop again, several times, when you can tension it.
    I have 4 cleats riveted onto the mast. This does most jobs. Your cleats look ok but the question is how strong are they and the wood they are on. I was told to bolt cleats onto a decent strong bit of wood (that’s firmly attached itself).
    Outhaul, the way you have attached it to the end of the boom looks ok to get you onto the water. Pinnel and Bax do a fitting you can rivet onto the end of the boom and attach an attachment to if you want something better. You can put a failsafe on by attaching a line from your clew cringle to the main sheet block, in case your outhaul fails at sea.
    I haven’t a clue about your tabernacle, that looks a bit horrid, make sure you get that bit right! Good luck and hope you get to sea soon.

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