Latest News: Forums Technical User friendly asymmetric spinnaker

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  • #19728
    RogerLennard
    Participant

    I want to try to use my asymmetric spinnaker more this season. I have been thinking about ways of making it more user friendly. The issues that I have are twofold: Firstly it is tricky to uphaul the asymmetric past my furled genoa. Secondly, unless the conditions are perfect, I often dump the asymmetric in the water when downhauling.
    Is it easy or possible or worthwhile to move the forestay/genoa fixing point to the other side of the spinnaker hole? Would the genoa need to be a different shape since its luff would be at a different angle? Would its uphaul wire need to be changed in length to suit the new position?

    Has anyone looked into the idea of having an asymmetric that could simply be furled or unfurled, like the ones on bigger sailing boats? Would a ‘snuffer’ work?

    Could members please pass on their thoughts and years of experience to help.

    #19746
    john1162
    Participant

    Hi Roger,

    I had a wayfarer world with an asymmetric spinnaker. Never liked it. I found the angles through which it was effective were not as good as with a symmetric spinnaker. If I set it up for a starboard launch I would have to recover on starboard. Recovering on port led to friction burns on the spinnaker.  I do know that Hartleys rig up some sailing school boats with asymmetrics as you suggest with the forestay behind the spinnaker hole and yes the genoa is cut differently.

    I think the basic problem is the shape. With the 29er or skiff type of boat their spinnakers have a short foot and a long luff. Yours has a long foot and a short luff.

    As a P.S. I must admit that once I had the boat pointing in the right direction in a strong wind and got a steady 13+ knots over a distance of half a mile. It only happened once though.

    John.

    #19748
    nickgiles
    Participant

    Hi Roger,
    There will be many Wayfarers out there with more skill and experience than I have so I am probably the last person to give advice! We bought a World with the asymmetrical spinnaker because the Wayfarer Handbook said it was easier to launch and recover than the symmetrical. Ours is probably the original set up so you have to a raise the spinnaker, pull out the bowsprit and pull down the tack at the same time. Best (only?) done on a port tack and provided the sheets and down haul correctly located no problem. Recovery (again on the port tack) nearly always required hand stuffing the spinnaker down the shute. Following help from fellow Wayfarers on the Forum we were advised that two attachment points for the down haul one third and two thirds up the sail with a ring and bobbin on the lower one helped recovery, but we still struggle!
    Further practice needed this year, but great when it’s working, either drifting home in the evening when the wind has dropped or scorching along in a reasonable breeze. Good luck
    Nick Giles W9922 LizzieB

    #19750
    RogerLennard
    Participant

    Thanks for your help John and Nick. It seems I am not alone in my battles with the spinnaker. When it is up and flying, the effect is quite stunning. I just need to work on the getting it up and down aspects. I am toying with the idea of making a snuffer so that it can be uphauled and be ready to unsheathe. This would mean that the bowsprit would need to be permanently extended, when using the snuffer. I wonder if the extra windage of a snuffed asymmetric would be an issue.

    If I get the chance to play, I may try making a snuffer.

    #19751
    john1162
    Participant

    You are ever the optimist Roger. If I was going to go down the asymmetric route I would borrow one from an RS 500 or 29er or if I was feeling brave a 49er and rig up an external spinnaker halliard at the correct height and give it a go. I bet you would find it a lot easier to handle. You never know. If it worked you could punt your idea to RH.

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