Latest News: Forums Technical Spinnaker running rigging

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  • #4239
    JoJo
    Member

    Renovations nearing completion – I want to rig my spinnaker and have forgotten how the sheets run around the inside of the boat – any hints tips or photos gratefully received. 😛

    #9748
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    There is no standard way to rig a spinnaker. The class rules don’t tell us how to rig it, they only give the location of the upper sheave and the maximum length of the boom.

    Everyone seems to have different preferences. Without detailed information on where your blocks, sheaves and other spinny parts are located we can only tell you in general terms how a spinnaker is rigged, but I assume you already know that. There are some pictures on the WIT that may be of help. If you need information on the tiny details we would have to have a look at your boat, or maybe you can post some pictures of the parts you are not sure of?

    #9749
    JoJo
    Member

    Thanks that is exactly what I wanted – it is only for an old boat I will be using for casual cruising – I race a Dart 18 most of the time.

    #9930
    PeterW3035
    Member

    Hi JoJo, did you get your spinnaker gear sorted?

    #10188
    annabelbowker
    Participant

    My spinnaker sheets go through a hole in the deck near the aft hatch, then down to a block near the floor, along to a block at the same height near the thwart and up to a jam cleat on the side of the deck. Mine’s a woody mk 1. There is also a fitting near the shroud for the guy (the sheet attached to the spinnaker pole) which you can hook the guy round and keep the pole down. On the mast there are D rings, one to attach the pole at the same position as the haliard D rings, and higher for the uphaul (which is elastic) as well. The downhaul is attached to a cleat. I must say I don’t race my boat competitively although the previous owner, who set this lot up, did.

    #10774
    PeterW3035
    Member

    I have acquired a second hand mast and I’m now closer to getting my spinnaker sorted.

    There are two main issues to sort before I drill holes in my wooden deck and thwart !!!

    1.The spinnaker sheets come to the thwart and all seem to exit up through a double exit block. I have now seen cleats mounted towards the stern, towards the bow and towards the gunnel, even seen one wayfarer with no cleats at all. What is the consensus? It will only be for cruising or casual club racing.

    2. My mast has an external eye, I was intending to put a small block on this eye and run the uphaul & downhaul down through two holes in the foredeck close to the mast. I already have a hole through the splashboard and deck for my furling line, this seems to conflict with the measurement rules;

    Class Rules item 20.4 In foredeck. Two holes of maximum aggregate diameter 26 (1”). Neither of these holes shall be centred more than 64 (2½”) from
    the mast recess.

    Is there any other option that would give adjustment of the pole to the helm? As far as I can see the pole downhaul does not need to be adjustable but just needs to be elasticated with a stopper on the rope to stop it skying.

    #10776

    OMG!

    Class Rules item 20.4 In foredeck. Two holes of maximum aggregate diameter 26 (1”). Neither of these holes shall be centred more than 64 (2½”) from
    the mast recess.

    Peter, I happen to have peeped at the forum this morning: I was about to put a sheave through the deck in front of the mast to lead back jib furling lines, now I see I can’t do that within the rules. The smallest sheave I can see anywhere makes a hole about 17mm x7. However I already have a hole for the spinny downhaul (as discussed above) so if I ever fitted two for a continuous line furler that was led back, would I be outlawed? What exactly is aggregate diameter?

    I know I’ve heard cruising folk talking about leading the furling/reefing lines back and I don’t see how I can do that without a sheave or two (two for a continuous line system)

    is this rule about keeping the foredeck strong? I can’t think of another purpose, but I would have thought that specifying they have to be near the mast would go against that consideration. surely one could easily reinforce the area around the holes with a bit of extra ply?

    does anyone know more about this rule?

    Boris W6330

    #10778
    PeterW3035
    Member

    Hi Andrew

    Glad someone has looked in on the Forum, seems to be very quiet but maybe everyone is on the water sailing not having to work like some of us 😆

    It does seem an odd rule, my furling line drops through an inset block through the deck and the hole I cut for that must be bigger than one inch, although the hole for the line is obviously a lot smaller.

    I’m sure Bramble will never be measured but most rules have some logic but this one escapes me at the moment.

    #10797
    PeterW3035
    Member

    Any chance of any other comments? Need to get on and drill some holes 🙄

    #10798
    Geof
    Member

    I am not an expert but would assume the restriction on holes is because they will mean a hole in the buoyancy tank in some of the Wayfarer Marks. By limiting the size then water ingress is modest so still safe.
    That was certainly the case for the Etchells keelboats which had a similar rule.
    You only need 1 hole for the downhaul – the uphaul exits the mast above the pole so by connecting the 2 at the pole itself then only 1 hole needed.
    No experience of furlers.

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