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  • #4427
    admin
    Member

    I plan to fit rowlocks on my Mk2 on which I have rigged with centre sheeting having a swivelling fairlead and ratchet block tight aft of the thwart .

    Those of you who have a similar arrangement, what do you do with the boom and mainsail when under oars? I assume that the sail needs to be rolled away on or around the boom the boom and the whole lot stowed to one side with the sheet disconnected. Or do you rig a topping lift to support the boom? Then there’s the fairlead and ratchet in just the right place to nadger your tackle (Gentlemen’s Downstairs).

    What’s the best way?

    Mike

    #10764
    Bob Harland
    Participant

    Mike,
    if we are rowing any distance, then we un-ship the centre part of the mainsheet, stow the sail round the boom and then drop the boom plus sail and stow in the boat.
    We find if the boom is left on the gooseneck it will still foul the rowers head – even with a topping lift.

    For a short distance we sometimes pull the boom up with a reefing line, and the helm holds the centre part of the mainsheet away from the rower.
    Rowing with one oar – sitting off-centre – also works in some conditions.
    Or we might just use the paddle.

    hope that helps
    bob

    #10765

    Yes it is a bit of a pain. I find that I tend to row in one of two situations:
    – heading out from the beach to rig the boat at a buoy (on days with an onshore wind). In this case, I have the main ready to raise but loosely bundled up with the boom in the bottom of the boat. Yes, you end up sitting on it but usually it’s only for a few minutes.
    – out on the water and the wind fails. When it is this calm, you can just use one of the reefing lines to top up the sail and keep it out of the way. It can be useful to loosely secure the mainsheet somehwere to stop it flapping in your face.

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