Latest News: Forums Technical Righting Lines

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  • #4104
    BluTak
    Participant

    I want to fit righting lines and have some questions. Tape taped to the shroud seems sensible. Can I just fasten them to the shroud or should they go to the mast. Presumably you swim with the end round the bow to get them accross the boat but if they are not fastened to the shroud they will slide to the front of the boat and need repositioning. (I know that wet 10mm jib sheets can be difficult to throw accross the boat in any wind so won’t be trying to throw tape into the wind) If you swim round the stern its further so the lines need to be longer presumably and theres more chance of getting entangled in the mainsheet. A footloop sounds a brilliant idea to get onto the rail. Bearing mind it is an ancient heavy Mk1 usually full of cruising junk what does anyone suggest – lead in the end of the tape!?
    Robert

    #8990
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    How about having them round the shroud plates one end and the other too the transom.

    Im in favour of them connected to the boat both ends so as to make a loop,not just one rope you have to swing off.

    C P 🙂

    #8994
    BluTak
    Participant

    Thanks Colin – could you explain – does one go from shroud round the boat to other shroud and the other shroud round transom to shroud? I assume underneath rudder, engine, brackets etc. Could you possibly explain more fully
    Thanks Robert

    #8999
    Adrian Pery
    Member

    Robert,

    There is a lot of talk on this thread (viewtopic.php?f=5&t=417) and this one (viewtopic.php?f=3&t=739)

    I added righting lines in 2008 after advice from John Mellor. Mine is one rope that goes around the mast and out through the chain plates on either side. The free end runs back to the spinaker block where it is kept in an elastic keeper.

    [attachment=2:1bb7tv41]righting lines photo.JPG[/attachment:1bb7tv41]
    [attachment=1:1bb7tv41]Righting lines drawings.JPG[/attachment:1bb7tv41]

    Having practised with mine (see thread here: viewtopic.php?f=4&t=639) I would make the following observations.

    1. When on her side it is hard to reach up and grab righting lines on the side of the boat (see photo as it is a long way to the blue line up by the gunwhale) – not sure of solution to this but having righting lines taped to the shrouds would only make it harder to get at them rather than a free long line running along the side. Oddly, or perhaps not unsurprisingly, it is easier when there is total inversion!

    [attachment=0:1bb7tv41]P8010016v2.JPG[/attachment:1bb7tv41]

    2. A foot loop would help on the end of the lines – but if they are too long they will get in the way of everything else.

    3. They are an essential aid.

    So in summary – perhaps mine need to be a bit longer but not much, as once freed they are nearly long enough and anything longer would get in the way when sailing – unless they are taped up in which case i think they would be harder to access when you need them in a hurry. I think there is enough else going on around the transom to want more lines that might catch and drag at inopportune moments.

    #9001
    sailfree
    Member

    With a small light helm and tending to fat (but not tall) crew (thats me!) that were always prepared to fly a spinnaker as soon as anyone else did I consider myself an expert on righting lines!

    We use a polyproplene rope (it floats!) in which I formed loops at one end to go round the shroud positions. I knot the rope every 450mm and form a foot loop at exactly the right height so that I can use it as a foothold to heave myself over the sides after righting. Total length of righting line I judged on worse case standing on an inverted boat with backside against the centreboard and having enough rope for a good pull! Do not underestimate the importance of a foot loop as you can be very tired especially if it is cold and windy and you have been struggling to turn the boat round so that the mast and sails are downwind before trying to right the capsize. In our Woody we never bothered bailing but always went on a reach or broad reach (if capsize while downwind sailing)and sailed the water out through the bailers and completed the race. Obviously it becomes more difficult in a sea with waves but inland and Poole Harbour we always managed it and completed the race. At best I could grap the righting line (that I left hanging inboard) as we started to go over (just past the point of no return!) and throw myself over the side and immediately right the boat with the helm still in it. Its a matter of practice and we seemed to have plenty at times as we always went out whatever the conditions if others did!

    Hope this helps.

    #9002
    BluTak
    Participant

    adrian, sailfree and colin – when totally inverted I presume you swim round the bow – not the stern?
    Robert

    #9003
    sailfree
    Member

    As I suggested the secret is for the crew to grab the righting line and go over once the boat is definately capsizing and thereby eith stop the capsize or at least stop it inverting.

    If you find yourself with an inverted boat- I have never considered whether to go round the stern or bow – just get one each side at the shroud position! Get the helm to throw the “floating” polypropolyne line over the upturned hull and you can use it to help you scramble up onto the hull. Helm should then go to the stern and help swim boat round so that mast & rig are downwind (never Upwind – boat just flips over once wind gets under sails). Once boat is horizontal helm gets into hull so that they are scooped up as boat comes up and ready to immediately free off sheets, grab tiller and start sailing water out immediately crew are back in boat (useing toe/foot loop in righting line).

    Gee I wish we were as good at sailing as we are at righting a capsize!!

    #9004
    BluTak
    Participant

    Thank you for all your help. I confess that although I’ve done a fair bit of Wayfarer sailing I’ve never even come close to capsizing. I use a jib only, have good reefing and don’t use a spinnaker. But I’ve always thought its a possibility and often rescue is pretty remote. I have had a secumar fitted for some years but have never used it . The righting lines seem an excellent idea an I think I will lead them from the shrouds back down the guwhale to a bungee which I’ll hook on to keep them tight. I will also fit foot loops and knots as recommended. I hope this thread is useful to others. Thank you
    Robert

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