Latest News: Forums Technical Rear buoyancy tank struts…

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  • #21191
    slaval
    Participant

    Hi, the old GRP wayfarer I have bought had two vertical ply struts that seem to have been glass’ed in place inside the rear buoyancy tank. I presume this was not part of the original construction and have been added to improve the rigidity of the structure. Does that seem right? Anyway they have completely rotted away so I am wondering whether to replace them whilst I undertake the refurbishment of the dinghy. Any thoughts welcome. Sean.

    #21193
    waypad
    Participant

    Hello Sean,
    You don’t say whether the inserts are bonded to the transom or the bulkhead. So I can only suggest that if the former, then they may have been to support an outboard, (which I have done) or if the latter, perhaps to fix some sort of container somewhere below the tiller, which is something I am now considering. Anyway, hope it soon gets sorted.
    Regards, Pete (7059)

    #21194
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Photo? (email me if you can’t upload – w3177she [at] rwater.co.uk)

    #21196
    slaval
    Participant

    I’ll take a photo and post it tomorrow (the dinghy isn’t at my home), but basically the timber struts are vertical from the hull to the top of the buoyancy compartment.

    #21198
    slaval
    Participant

    Heres a pic of what I am talking about..

    #21201
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    I have not seen anything like that on any wayfarer. I guess it is something custom made by a previous owner. Its purpose? Your guess is as good as mine.

    Grind it out and smooth the inner hull. Finish with some epoxy or 2 pot paint (or both). Note that the tank should have some buoyancy material (see class rules) unless it is under the gunwales. A waterproof container (with gear), or empty soda bottles work just as good as dedicated buoyancy bags IMHO.

    I have been using plastic sauerkraut kegs, the type popular amongst canoeists, also sold as pet food containers (pet shops charge much less). Next to providing emergency buoyancy they are a great place to store spares and other gear that needs to remain dry as well as my phone, wallet and lunch.  The right size keg may even store a sleeping bag or spare clothes.

    Here is an example: http://www.solentplastics.co.uk/marine-storage-products-boxes/waterproof-and-airtight-kegs-drums/

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