Latest News: Forums Technical Ratchet blocks for genoa sheetss

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  • #11315
    matoi
    Member

    Here’s a photo of Matt Sharman’s Water Witch taken several years ago:
    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/oUGSWVTc4uB0YCznbZSjhNMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink
    If I understood correctly it’s a setup many experienced cruisers use. I like the idea of having ratchet blocks in the system becuase I sometimes sail with some young ladies which find the genoa tension difficult, but I haven’t installed this yet because of cost and because I’m not sure I’d like the extra obstructions on the thwart…
    I haven’t quite grasped what Colin describes (probably because English is not my native language), but if someone has a photo of a system which has rathcet function in it, but that doesn’t clutter the thwart so much, please do post it.
    All the best,
    Mato

    #11316
    Dave Bevan
    Member

    Anyone tried Spinlock PXR’s?

    #11317
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @Colin Parkstone wrote:

    Then have a floating ratchet block which is NOT automatic, a switched one is best so it lets you have it on or off as that clicking in light winds drives me mad!!!!

    I thought the clicking of the ratchet in light winds was to inform the helm the crew hasn’t fallen asleep. :mrgreen:

    #11318
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @matoi wrote:

    Here’s a photo of Matt Sharman’s Water Witch

    That is much like my set-up. However, if I were to do it again I wouldn’t use the expensive swivel-cleats but just simple (home made) pedestals under the cleats. A swivel is only useful for the mainsheet IMHO. The swivels are not only very expensive (if they are by Harken) but they also serve no real purpose and take a way premium sitting space from the thwart, important for the crew to shift their bottom while balancing the boat in light winds. This b*tt space is even more important when the crew is married to you, or worse, your daughter…..

    I have adjusted all my cleats to disengage when the sheet is pulled in the normal way. This was done by changing their height and angle relative to the fairlead. I believe this to be a basic safety feature and I would not go to sea on a boat where the cleats are not carefully adjusted, the only alternative being cleat-less sheeting. I would expect every owner to go through this exercise. You can fabricate the wedges and fillers needed yourself but the cleat makers sell them ready made from the same material as the cleats as well.

    #11325
    PeterD
    Member

    … or maybe use a longer thinner sheet to make the sheeting 2:1. Fasten the sheet at the fairlead, run thru’ the eye in the genoa clew and back thru’ the fairlead.

    #11327
    matoi
    Member

    @PeterD wrote:

    … or maybe use a longer thinner sheet to make the sheeting 2:1. Fasten the sheet at the fairlead, run thru’ the eye in the genoa clew and back thru’ the fairlead.

    I tried that solution, but unfortunately I don’t remeber what thickness was the sheet I used. It didn’t work, as if there was too much friction. It seemed that blocks at the genoa clew would really be needed for this to work, and I wasn’t interested to try it because I assumed these would bang badly into the mast when tacking.

    But maybe the experiment is worth repeating with very thin sheet, and blocks instead of the simple fairliead on the return run…

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