Latest News: Forums Racing Racing novice – advice

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 40 total)
  • AUTHOR
    POSTS
  • #3641
    krgough
    Participant

    Hi Guys

    I wonder if anyone can advise a racing beginner. My club doesn’t have a wayfarer fleet so I’m usually chasing Lasers, Albacores, Phantom’s and a buch of different RS’s. The Albacore and Phanton are very good and I’m gauging myself against them. We had a couple of really good starts last year but they came to nothing. We are reasonably fast downwind (even without a spinnaker) but upwind we are rubbish. We don’t point anything like as high as either the Albacore or Phantom and we are often very overpowered.

    My setup ….
    I have boom end sheeting on the main as opposed to centre sheeting.
    I don’t have a cunningham.
    I have a highfield lever on the genoa.
    I have a fairly simple kicker set up – I think it’s 4:1??
    I don’t have rig tension gauge.
    No packers in front of the mast.
    Mast pin is loose.
    Rake is close to the setup numbers I’ve seen on the website but I need to check this again.

    I don’t particularly want to change the sheeting arrangement if I can get away with it so I’m wondering if that’s a killer issue – ie. we will never point well unless we have centre sheeting?

    I’m planning to re-check the mast rake when I setup this year – I’ve been advised that this is the main thing that affects pointing? I did check this last year and I think it’s close to the numbers on the setup sheet. The pin was free this year. I don’t have any packing bits between the mast and the deck – Do I need these?

    I plan to fit a cunningham – I’m hoping that it will make a big difference to the overpowered problem so that we can get the boat a bit flatter and sheet the main in a bit – we often have to spill like mad to keep it under control.

    Any other tips for getting us upwind? Do I really have to change the sheeting?

    I’m currently only trying to get in the same ballpark so I’m trying to work out what changes are absolutley necessary and which I can affoard to leave for later years.

    regards

    Keith

    #6414
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Keith

    I’m certainly not an expert but if you’d like to come along to Warsash SC sometime I can show you how our boat is set up.

    You will need some chocks at deck level otherwise the mast could overbend. Check your rake again and also try and check your rig tension to make sure that’s in the right ballpark.

    I’d expect Albacores and Phantoms to be faster to windward than a Wayfarer anyway so dont worry too much about this.

    Even better you’d be welcome to join in for one of our Wednesday eveing races once we get going in April if you’d like to have other Wayfarers to sail against. We have between 4 – 6 out most weeks.

    Cheers

    Roger
    W10318

    #6415
    krgough
    Participant

    Hi Roger,

    Thanks for the offer – I’m at Netley so depending on the tides I could sail down to Warsash. It would be nice to try and compare ourselves to another wayfarer.

    regards

    Keith

    #6416
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Hi Keith,

    We’re in the same position at Notts County – no Wayfarer fleet as such, so we take part in mixed handicap racing.

    The main (!) points that strike me looking at your questions are that the main sheeting shouldn’t be a problem for pointing but the kicker isn’t powerful enough. You would be able to depower your mainsail more with a decent kicker than with a cunningham, although of course with both you would be even better off. I would sort out the kicker first (and twin it back to either side if it isn’t already). 12:1 would be a minimum target figure, with 16:1 probably better.

    You haven’t mentioned the genoa sheeting (unless I’ve forgotten a previous post). This will significantly affect your pointing ability. If the sheets lead from the clew to the sidedeck your pointing ability will be hampered, and you may not be able to do much about this without a sail change. If, however, your sheets lead from the clew to the front benches you should be fine (as long as you are able to get some tension in the foot of the sail, indicating that the genoa is designed to be sheeted here and not to the side deck).

    Would you be able to borrow a tension gauge?

    #6417
    krgough
    Participant

    Hi Dave

    Thanks for your advice. I’d forgotten about the bench sheeting thing on the Genoa. Mine is sheeted on the side deck – I’ll look at making that modification – Sounds like I might need a new Genoa?

    Kicker – mine has 4 ropes in between 2 double blocks – is that 4:1 ? What do you mean by “twin it back to either side” ?

    Tension Gauge – I think I’ll buy a gauge – I’ve seen one in a local shop for about £30.

    regards

    Keith

    #6418
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Hi Keith,

    The genoa will be the main reason for your lack of pointing ability.

    Two double blocks would give you 4:1. Twinning it back to either side means having a line from one side of the boat to the other via the kicker in such a way that you can adjust the kicker from your normal helming position without having to move inboard. There are some examples on the web, including:-

    http://www.wayfarer-international.org/WIT/race.related/RiggingTips/UncleAl/VangOuthaul/VangAlternatives.htm

    The “system #1” is more complicated – a combination of cascade and double/treble blocks. I think this setup gives 24:1 in total 😕 , with 6:1 from the double/treble, multiplied by two for each of the elements of the cascade (which is shown as being wire, but could be done in dyneema).

    The “vang alternative #2” is a simpler layout, and would give 12:1 total (6:1 from the triple blocks and this is doubled by the single block marked “Harken 082”).

    In both of these examples there is a continuous line from one side of the boat to the other (via the triple/double blocks in the first example and via the single “082” block in the second). Btw, the cheek blocks don’t add mechanical advantage but help guide the lines from the foot of the tabernacle back along the centreboard case. Another single block on each side about level with the back of the underside of the thwart will turn the line out behind the thwart to a jamming cleat mounted for example on the rear face of the thwart approx. 2/3rds of the way out from the centreboard case, to suit you.

    If possible lead the twin lines just below the top of the centreboard case, otherwise the crew’s feet can tend to stand on the line just when you’re trying to adjust it.

    I hope that wasn’t too confusing…

    #6419
    krgough
    Participant

    Hi Dave

    Excellent advice – thank you.

    regards

    Keith

    #6424
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Keith,
    I concur with the advice that has already been stated.
    1) Genoa sheeting must be sorted out first – get it sheeting to the benches and check the sheeting angle is correct (use telltales on the luff of the genoa.
    2) Next priority is the kicker – you’ll need it once the wind gets up to the point that you and your crew are both leaning out. Below that wind strength you don’t need much kicker.
    3) You need plenty of rig tension (genoa halyard very tight) so you should be straining on your highfield lever in winds F3 and above. Muscle boxes are more powerful than highfield levers but you’ll be OK with the lever for now.
    4) Centre or boom end sheeting makes no difference – just a matter of preference for boat handling.
    5) Cunningham is only necessary in strong winds when you are severely overpowered – F5 and up.
    6) Chocks are used to keep the mast not too bent and to keep any force from transferring through the pin – your pin should remain loose. This will not have a huge affect on your pointing but it will help a bit.
    7) Make sure your foot tension in the main is nice and high along the boom. I keep it pretty tight in all wind strengths upwind.

    A lot of pointing ability is down to the way the boat is sailed. Keep it flat, don’t stall the sails, antricipate gusts and lulls, steer and sheet main constantly.

    Cheers, Toby

    #6425
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Before you splash out on a tension guage try tightening the rig until the the leeward shroud has a little tension on it . The Merlins do this but for best effect you need a jib cunningham which you tension after getting the rig tension right – otherwise you risk pulling the draft in the genoa too far forward .

    #6426
    krgough
    Participant

    Hi Everyone,

    Thanks for all this excellent advice!! I really appreciate it.

    We used to have a wooden wayfarer (814) a few years back and we were at the Nationals at Falmouth in 2000 (not racing then). The fairleads were on the decks of that one as well and were told then that we should move them onto the benches – I had completely forgotten.

    I could not believe how far off the wind we where last year compared to the others – I have high hopes that moving the fairleads and beefing up my kicker will sort out the problems.

    Thanks again.

    regards

    Keith

    #6429
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Keith if you want to come to Warsash to collect you are welcome to borrow my rig tension guage

    Cheers

    Roger

    #6430
    krgough
    Participant

    Hi Roger

    Thank you so much for the offer – I think I might go and buy one – there’s a chandlery in eastleigh (LDC racing) that has them for jus under £30 so I’m planning to buy myself a late Christmas present 😀

    Thanks again

    regards

    Keith

    #6433
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Here is another classic 16:1 kicker setup:-

    http://www.wayfarer-international.org/WIT/race.related/RiggingTips/TonJaspers/TJcascade_vang.html

    In fact I’m thinking of changing my hybrid multi-block & cascade system to a simple cascade (with a slight “twist”) during my winter re-fit.

    #6442

    To add to / slightly amend Toby’s reply:

    1) Genoa sheeting is vital. BUT if your genoa halyard is not tight enough, pulling the clew of the sail inboard will just allow the sail to act as a gigantic air brake.
    So, get the jib halyard tension first. This means, when you put the highfield lever on, that you should NOT be able to do it one handed. Ideally, you should need the crew pulling forward hard on the forestay while you can only just put the highfield lever on.

    2) Next priority is the kicker – you’ll need it once the wind gets up to the point that you and your crew are both leaning out.
    AND you will need chocks in the mast (in front of the mast at deck level). Otherwise, when you pull on the kicker, the mast will bend and the jib halyard tension will be reduced: jib luff sag = air brake time again.

    A lot of pointing ability is down to the way the boat is sailed.
    KEEP IT FLAT. The pressure from the sails works in the right direction, and also the foils work better. FLAT often means varying between 5 degrees of windward heel and upright in the gusts. NOT 5 degrees of leeward heel and then tipped further in the gusts.
    The main sheet should be still for about 10% of the time on the beat. So for the other 90%, play it continuously. Let it out: power angles forward, boat accelerates, sail starts to flap. Pull it in, sail stops flapping, power goes more sideways, boat points better.

    #6454
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I agree that getting genoa set up is first priority.
    Cunningham and kicker rarely need pulling on tight.

    inboard sheeting and replace highfield lever to get enough tension to straighten forestay.
    i had a highfield lever origionaly and used various ways of geting it tight enough,but then it moved down the mast and slackened again.

    A few blocks and a cleat gives a very good and cost effective way of tightening the leading edge of the genoa.

    And I know how slow I go upwind from the day I forgot to tighten it.

    roger

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 40 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.