Latest News: Forums Technical Pole uphaul/boom outhaul rigging questions

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  • #3683
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    A lot of questions here!

    Pole Uphaul
    Having used an externally rigged spinny pole uphaul last year (run via turning block at spreader height, through exisiting eye in foredeck and cheekblock at foot of tabernacle) I am considering rigging this internally. I have consulted the W book and searched W websites elsewhere 😉
    I gather a sheave is installed at spreader height and also “250mm from the mast foot”.
    1. Is the latter measured from the heel of the mast or from the start of the metal? (I am worried about putting a hole in the wrong place and weakening the mast, or worse, ruining it completely 😯 ).
    2. Is it necessary to reinforce this area afterwards using a mast collar?
    3. I have my downhaul arrangement run inside a PVC pipe under the foredeck towards the bow – will this interfere with the new arrangement?

    Boom outhaul
    I wish to replace the string and blocks in my boom outhaul. I don’t have access to a swaging tool and am not particularly keen to replace with wire, simply to ‘upgrade’ the existing set-up.
    1. Recommendations as to best low stretch material that can be spliced to blocks eg. Spectra?
    2. Never spliced before – do any of the online chandlers eg. P&B, Sailboats, Trident, etc undertake this service? (Yes – I know I should learn to do it myself!).

    All advice welcome and appreciated!

    #6729
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @Robin 9255 wrote:

    1. Is the latter measured from the heel of the mast or from the start of the metal?

    All measurements are relative to the black bands. If you lost the black bands you can repaint or re-tape them relative to the pivot hole or relative to the goosneck (provided it is not a sliding goosneck). The positions of the black bands and the position of the spi-sheave are in the class rules, available from every Wayfarer ass. web site.

    @Robin 9255 wrote:

    2. Is it necessary to reinforce this area afterwards using a mast collar?

    No. The downhaul stays as it is. Alternatively it can be led down to a cheek block on teh side of the tabernacle. From that cheek block a bungee can be made to run along the center board case to the back of the boat. Some do that below the floor boards, though it is a clean solution I rather like to be able to fix things afloat….
    The knot between the dowhaul and the bungee is strategically placed so that the knot running against the cheek block defines the maximum height of the pole.

    @Robin 9255 wrote:

    3. I have my downhaul arrangement run inside a PVC pipe under the foredeck towards the bow – will this interfere with the new arrangement?

    No.

    @Robin 9255 wrote:

    1. Recommendations as to best low stretch material that can be spliced to blocks eg. Spectra?

    Use normal rigging rope, no need to spend the extra money. The only critical lines are the main and Genoa halyards. You want those to be low stretch and very strong. Most of us use Dyneema for the main halyard and stainless steel for the Genoa halyard. All other lines, except the sheets, can be made of 8 or 16 plait pre-stretched polyester (or even nylon in some cases). Use what ever your local chandler stocks. More important IMHO is to use different colours for each control line. I believe it helps a lot in quickly finding the right control line when the going gets tough.

    @Robin 9255 wrote:

    2. Never spliced before – do any of the online chandlers eg. P&B, Sailboats, Trident, etc undertake this service? (Yes – I know I should learn to do it myself!).

    Splicing is easy, try it. Many web sites show how to do it, with pictures. (What else should a Wayfarer sailor do during those long, cold winter evenings?) But in a Wayfarer most control lines are simply knotted. Master the bowline and use that to attach blocks to the end of a line. Yes, P&B can do it for you, in fact they can make your whole boat look like new again, that is how they make a living. But since they are professionals they like to get paid for their services….

    Some other remarks:
    Always make high loaded control lines a few inches too long. that enables you to cut a piece of once a year so that another part of the line runs through a block. This spreads the wear and the line will last for many years. Another trick is to turn it upside down, again the goal is to have another part of the line run through a block. If nothing else, at least use these tricks on a Dyneema main halyard, it wears really quick!

    Perhaps you already know but the pole uphaul usually comes out the front of the mast foot. From there it is run upward, through a block below deck in front of the mast. From that block it goes down again to a cheek block on the side of the tabernacle and from there to the sloping rear of the CB case where it is cleated.
    Another neat trick is to add a strategically placed knot to the end of the uphaul that will allow you to just loosen the uphaul from its cleat and forget about it. The knot will limit the pole to drop down only as far as to line up nicely with the boom for easy stowage.

    #6730
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks for detailed reply – I didn’t make clear in my original post that the 250mm from the mast foot measurement referred to the exit point below deck for the second sheave required to bring the uphaul out of the mast.

    #6731
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Ah, I see. I assume you are using an old style mast and an existing sheave at the rear of the mast? You can still use the same sort of arrangement. Go from the exit sheave up to a block below deck and then back down to a cheek block, etc.

    If you try to go straight aft from the exit sheave the line will be too high above the CB case and you will trip over it in a gibe or tack. I have not seen anyone use an eye or flip block near the mast foot but I see no reason why it should not work. It would still lead the control line over the top of the CB case though. I prefer the control lines below the top of the CB case and keep the top clear.

    Be advised that old style masts are waterproof, the halyards run through the sail groove and the Genoa sheave is in a welded box. That is why people used an external block for the spinnaker with those masts. They did not want to loose their mast buoyancy. The Genoa sheave box may create a problem if you want to lead the spi-halyard through the front compartment of the mast and the old sheaves near the foot do not access the front compartment, only the sail groove.

    These old style buoyant masts are no longer made and quite popular with cruisers. Perhaps you can sell it at a good price and get a new modern racing mast with all sheaves installed and a five sheave mast foot? On the other hand, these old style forged and welded masts are almost indestructible and have much better bend characteristics. The speed gain of having the lines inside the mast is almost non existent. It is mainly a cosmetic improvement. I have done it but I wouldn’t do it again. It is not worth the trouble and not worth loosing the self buoyancy of the mast.

    #6732
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Ton – thanks again for your very informative, prompt and helpful response!! 😀

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