Latest News: Forums Technical Painting hull on side

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  • #30646
    davidhs
    Participant

    Hi

    I’m hoping to repaint the hull of my Mark 1 composite during lockdown. I keep the boat in a shed which is narrow and the driveway is also narrow (8ft max) and requires access for bikes. My idea is it put the boat on its side leaning maybe 15 degrees beyond vertical.

    I’ve seen Wayfarers leant over on their sides. The question is, can the hull take the strain for an extended period? What should I be aware of? Any dos or don’ts?

    I realise that the angle at which I lean it will depend on the natural point at which it will be stable beyond the vertical. I also intend using as much padding as possible.

    Thanks

    David

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by davidhs. Reason: Bad formatting
    #30648
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Hi David,

    My non-expert view would be that this is fine in the way that you describe – with padding etc. Difficult to achieve without leverage from the mast, but OK once you’ve got the boat tipped over

    I’m tempted to ask why you’re painting a composite hull, but I’m sure you have a good reason 🙂

    Good luck!

    Dave

    #30655
    davidhs
    Participant

    Hi Dave

    Thanks very much. Yes, you are right – actually getting it onto its side is going to be the hard part. Unfortunately I can’t enlist the help of friends as going to help someone turn their boat over wasn’t one of the 4 things permitted during lockdown, unless it was somewhere in the small print! An outrageous oversight in my opinion – what could be more essential than boat maintenance in time of lockdown? I’m sure that even Derbyshire police would turn a blind eye to that…

    The reason I am painting it is that it has been painted before and the paint has yellowed and there are a number of imperfections to fill etc. I know that some frown on painting GRP boats, and obviously a pristine gelcoat would be preferable, but it also seems that painting GRP boats is a fairly regular occurrence more generally, and as long as it is done well the difference between that and a gelcoat is not necesarily easy to spot.

    Well thats the way I’m rationalising it anyway. Am I missing something?

    Thanks again

    David

     

    #30656
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    That makes sense – it’ll be transformed!

    #30661
    davdor7038
    Participant

    Hi davidhs,

    I had to do some repairs to scrapes on the runners on the bottom of the hull a while ago.

    Needing to take the mast off the boat due to lack of space between a shed and the ditch to turn the boat over, I used a block and tackle (actually a fiddle block with double pulley, cleat and some extra turning pulleys) to give me the leverage I needed. Secured to a convenient tree.  I ran a line from the cleat on the bow, through the grab handle at the spray rail and onto the traveller rail on the stern (making a bridle).  (MKII boat) to spread the load rather than carrying all the load at a single point and attached the pulling line to the bridle.

    As well as padding underneath the hull, you might also need to stop the hull sliding along the ground as you start to turn the boat over.  I think I was able to just put my foot against the bottom initially and as the hull turned and the weight came on the bottom, it stopped sliding.

    Having a cleat in the block and tackle system makes life much more convenient but you will need some way to tie off the lifting ropes anyway.  If only for a breather if working on your own.

    hope this is of some help

    davdor.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by davdor7038.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by davdor7038.
    #30676
    davidhs
    Participant

    Thanks for that further advice. It is useful to know what it took. The drive in my case is bounded on both sides by house walls and there is nowhere to secure block and tackle to in the direction I would want to turn it. I’ll have a think though. Its all useful info.

    I was thinking about some arrangment to stop the bottom edge slipping as it is turned. However, it will also need to be moved out as the boat turns. So still a bit of a puzzle.

    Cheers.

    David

    #30683
    Tim Jeanneret
    Participant

    I turned my wooden boat over on my own inside a (large) shed last year. I lifted it to almost balancing on its side, braced the gunwale against the wall with a length of timber, then walked round the bow (holding it to stop it twisting and falling), pulled it over and lowered it down.

    It was a bit sketchy. The weight wasn’t too frightening (I’m fit enough but not particularly strong) but it was awkward. But if I’d had a few more different lengths  of timber to hand and more padding (thick cardboard) on the ground along the length of the boat it would have been relatively simple.

    Sliding it across when on its side sounds tricky with only one person. Could you put a small expansion bolt in the wall?

    #30706
    davidhs
    Participant

    That is helpful, thanks a lot.

    David

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