Latest News: Forums Technical Outboard problems?

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  • #4592
    PeterW3035
    Member

    We had a great sail on Saturday, in very blustery conditions we were glad we had the outboard to enable us to motor up Ashlet Creek into the wind. It would certainly have been too windy to row in. I have the 3.5 HP 2 stroke Mariner mounted on a bracket and we had two issues;

    1. I fixed the motor dead ahead and used the tiller and rudder to steer, the close manoeuvres became difficult as the wind caught the boat and with limited forward movement I managed to clash the rudder into the prop.

    2. then loosing complete control we were pushed over some moving lines, the prop jammed and stalled. In restarting we had lost power to the prop. Either I’ve sheared or dislodged something or damaged the clutch, if there is one ?

    So do you have your outboard permanently mounted or stowed and how do you avoid the rudder clashing with the prop?

    I’m now mechanic but is the loss of drive to the prop easily fixed?

    #11592
    Dave Bevan
    Member

    Don’t know about yours but outboards generally have a shear-pin on the prop drive, to prevent engine damage in the event of issues like you experienced. Take the prop off (mine is kept on the shaft with a split pin but that just keeps it in place), you should find the broken shear pin, and normally outboards are supplied with at least one spare. You should always carry a spare in case.

    My outboard is fixed ahead on a standoff bracket- makes it harder to control but keeps it away from the rudder, sheets, etc, but not trailing lines 💡

    #11593
    PeterW3035
    Member

    Thanks Dave,

    I hope it will be as simple as a shear pin, I’ll take the prop off & have a look later in the week.

    I need to check that the rudder does miss the prop when fixed dead ahead, certainly there is a less of control.

    The stand off bracket is good but maybe I just need more practice, anything other than close hauled there seems to be too much main sheet flying as you tack or jibe. Pulling in the slack does help but we manged to get the main round the engine three times in front of the Club House as we tacked to come in 😳 , I guess it’s always good to give entertainment to members in the Bar just glad we decided against jibing 😛 I have wondered about a length of elastic & ring along the boom to take up the slack 💡

    #11594
    Davdor7038
    Member

    I too, mount my outboard directly on the transom. What I do is mount the engine (2.5hp Suzuki) as far outboard as my wooden pad on the transom allows. I also slightly offset the tiller and prop so it’s driving slightly off-centre and outwards and not directly backwards. This also improves clearance a bit between the prop and rudder. I also stuck a bit of foam on the side of the tiller to act as a soft-stop when pushing the tiller over. It worked well until it fell off. But with the first 2 measures in place, I haven’t managed to mangle the rudder.

    #11595
    Dave Bevan
    Member

    These might help if you don’t have the manual for your your motor.

    The splitpin (a) locates the prop on the shaft, normally through an offset hole in the prop and a groove on the driveshaft.

    The shearpin (b) transmits the rotation from the driveshaft

    If the shearpin breaks, the splitpin ensures the prop doesn’t fall off!

    #11596
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    We have the outboard on a bracket which is about as close to the edge of the transom as it can be. With the rudder fully down it doesn’t strike the prop, but occasionally when leaving a beach (for example) if the rudder hasn’t yet been lowered completely there is a possibility of a clash.

    We always keep the outboard on the bracket when cruising – the only exception being occasionally when rolling the boat up a beach on fenders/rollers, because it’s an easy way to lighten the boat (and make the whole operation a bit easier and safer.)

    Where practical, when not motoring we keep a fabric cover with drawstring (sometimes slightly unfairly described as a shower cap) over the outboard cowling, which reduces the risk of snagging a sheet on the choke or starter knob. This is particularly useful when the motor is in the upright position – which it is occasionally for various reasons – as the choke and starter then face forwards (vulnerable) rather than downwards (hence out of harm’s way) as they do with the prop raised.

    Having the mainsheet attachment on the boom-end perhaps a foot or so further forward than usual helps clear the outboard when tacking, but makes less difference when gybing, due to the inevitable amount of slack. (There’s also a slightly increased theoretical risk of accidentally pulling the boom off the gooseneck if the kicker is very slack, but the mainsail will stop it going far.)

    #11597
    PeterW3035
    Member

    Thanks everyone for the advice, took the prop of last night and the shear pin was well and truly sheared at both ends. Replacement pins at £1.70 each seem a bit steep but I now have a spare so could fix it on the go if it happens again.

    @Dave Barker wrote:

    Where practical, when not motoring we keep a fabric cover with drawstring (sometimes slightly unfairly described as a shower cap) over the outboard cowling, which reduces the risk of snagging a sheet on the choke or starter knob. This is particularly useful when the motor is in the upright position – which it is occasionally for various reasons – as the choke and starter then face forwards (vulnerable) rather than downwards (hence out of harm’s way) as they do with the prop raised.

    Any chance of a photo?

    #11598
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Any chance of a photo?

    Hmmm – well it’s a bit like the one shown here, but less well-fitting. It was about £5 on Ebay a while ago… I reckon an old sail bag with drawstring would do the same job.

    #11600
    PeterW3035
    Member

    Thanks Dave, can’t possibly think why they call it a shower cap 😆

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