Latest News: Forums Technical Outboard brackets

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  • #3643

    On page 38 of the Wayfarer Book there is the picture of an outboard mounted on a removable bracket (the second of the pictures).

    I’ve looked around a few chandlery web sites without seeing anything that corresponds to this arrangement, which has a socket on the transom and a bracket that slots into the socket.

    Can anyone tell me what the proper name is to use to search for such a combination, or where I can get it?

    #6422
    howard
    Member

    Hi,

    I went to the Norfolk Rally last year and several folk had these – David Kirk in particular helped me greatly on this.

    You can buy the kit from Boats.n.Bits (01603 626069) or the web, I didn’t find anyone else who sold it. They sell a machined aluminium/powder steel version rather than the rather nice stainless ones that some folk have – you’ll have to make your own if that’s what you’d like. (I think I have a pdf of the design somewhere if you want it) Their version has a plastic pad on which to mount the motor, this was too long for my liking so I made a shorter wooden motor pad so as to mount the bracket as high as possible on the boat while keeping the motor at the right depth.

    They can provide a diagram; however, I have a Mk2, and there’s only one place you can put the bracket – with the top two screws in the transom water gutter. Most people seem to mount them on the port side, approx 400mm off the centre line.

    I think it’s called a wayfarer outboard bracket.

    #6423
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    I think the position of the fixed bracket is less invariable than Howard implies – ours is about 2 inches lower on the transom. Any higher and the boom wouldn’t clear the engine casing (unless the motor pad was adjusted accordingly I suppose…). Ours is a SmallCraft MkII and has an “obvious” mounting position which is however very off-centre, and on the starboard side, fwiw.

    Other outlets can supply the same kind of bracket – one person managed to get a bracket fitted to his boat cheaper than we got ours supply only! – but I must admit that Boats ‘n’ Bits were the only supplier I found on the web when looking for one last year.

    #6434

    Howard, Dave,

    Thank you very much for the information. I’ll have a look at boats and bits …

    Making something in stainless steel is way beyond me – I’ll settle for what is already available.

    Incidentally, you refer to getting the propellor at the right depth – what is the right depth? I infer from what The Book says (again p38) that a long shaft outboard is good for “more serious motoring”, but that one can manage with a short shaft.

    Elsewhere on the forum I’ve seen a discussion of which is best – is the real answer that it is not so critical?

    #6435
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    It’s critical to get the prop deep enough so that it doesn’t over-rev, but if it’s deeper than necessary it will pointlessly increase the effective draft of the boat, removing one of its great assets – its shallow draft. I’m not aware of any W sailors who use a long-shaft outboard, but I’m sure there are some.

    #6437
    popeye
    Member

    It is the general rule with outboards, regarding the depth of prop that the anti-cavitation plate, that flat fin above the prop, is level with the bottom of the keel. Any deeper and it creates to much drag, any higher, with a standard prop, and you begin to suck air.

    #6439
    howard
    Member

    Keels and caviation plates — my outboard manual (Malta) gives a similar picture (plate just below keel). However, the illustration is of a displacement powerboat where the keel is level under water.

    I’ve read the following in several accounts: the engine specification will tell you how much water you need over the cavitation plate; the water line on the wayfarer just touches the keel at the bottom of the transom, so you need to make sure that the cavitation plate sits below the keel by enough to ensure that it has the right amount of water.

    This might make the cavitation plate sit an inch or two under the keel line at the transom, depending on the motor requirements.

    #6440
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Also bear in mind that the weight of the outboard alters the trim of the boat, so the water level at the transom will be raised a little.

    Similarly, just as when you are sailing you position your body weight fore/aft to best advantage, you can do the same when motoring.

    #6441
    W10143
    Member

    I agree wholeheartedly Dave; especially when motoring singlehanded, it is difficult to raise the transom out of the water, ans a short shaft on a ‘standard’ bracket is more than adequate.

    David

    #6489

    Thank you again for all the advice. If you do a web search for “Wayfarer braket” (note the spelling) you get to Boats.n.bits straight away! Their spelling is a bit whimsical in several places (perhaps Richard Parker is heavily into the maths of quantum mechanics, where bra and ket have precise meaning and are combined to form a braket).

    Anyway it arrived very quickly, I was impressed. The next thing is to work out where to fix it – I imagine I will just follow the helpful fixing notes supplied by Boats.n.bits.

    #6576
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Richard also sells stainless steel brackets but they are slightly more expensive then the cast aluminium ones shown on his web site.

    #6781
    gpsmout
    Member

    What kind of outboard is a good one to choose and how much to pay?

    I have a 1964 woodie and have never had my own outboard on a dinghy. I was told last year, by Pennine marine of Skipton, who should know, that 2stroke motors are preferable as you can lie these flat, so the oil will not run out useful if transporting it in the rear buoyancy tank, but that you cannot lie a 4 stroke down flat as the engine oil will run out.

    Then he told me there are no current manufacturers of new 2 stroke outboards and that they are as rare as rocking horse dung for the reason given above!

    So what’s the opinion here?

    Regards

    #6782
    W10143
    Member

    Graham

    They are quite correct on both counts. As of last year, your government in the EU banned the sale of new 2stroke marine engines except for ‘commercial’ use.

    The 2stroke is arguably more robust than the 4stroke in that it can be stored upside down if you like, making it better suited for chucking in the car and the bottom of the boat. You can only buy them second hand.

    However.. It has been argued that the 4stroke may be more durable in a capsize situation for the very reason that it cannot be stored upside down – the oil in the sump drains into the cylinder and protects it.

    David

    #6783
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @gpsmout wrote:

    What kind of outboard is a good one to choose and how much to pay?
    Regards

    Anything over 2 HP you buy for others (towing). A 2 HP engine will keep your boat at hull speed at half throttle. You can even tow another Wayfarer, even two but probably not at hull speed. A 4 HP is twice as heavy and the weight is where you least want it, at the transom.

    I have had two two-HP two-strokes (both Suzuki) for many years but they do give problems if used at half throttle for long periods. You need to full throttle them form time to time to “blow them clean”. If not they stall and are hard to start again. Also, with a two stroke you need to carry a spark plug wrench and a copper haired brush…. The up side of a two stroke is that maintenance is easy and can be done without the help of a qualified technician. Even when it gets waterlogged in a capsize it can be fixed in the boat with nothing more then a spark plug wrench. Today I have a Honda 4 stroke that I have professionally checked every year for just a few quid. It runs very well at every throttle setting, no matter for how long, and sounds like an outboard rather then like a moped. I have not yet capsized with it and I have no idea what it takes to get it running again after a capsize. And yes, storing it in certain positions is a problem due to the oil in the engine, a non-existing issue with a two-stroke. Finally, I love the automatic clutch of the Honda that disengages the propeller at idle throttle setting. I don’t think any other brand has this, though the Suzuki two-HP four-stroke has a manual clutch. Most two-HP engines have no clutch at all and there is always a little thrust when idle-ing. The force is low enough for a man to hold a moored boat in position though. The real danger of the idle-ing propeller is damaging the rudder and/or the propeller.

    Visit the Seamark-Nunn website (51° 59.636′ N 1° 18.272′ E) for they often have a 2 HP special offer. Honda, Suzuki, Yamaha, or Mariner/Mercury are all good engines, choose what ever comes cheapest/ is on special offer.

    There is more to be found on the subject on the WIT pages.

    http://www.wayfarer-international.org/WIT/WITindex1.html
    http://www.seamarknunn.com/

    #6784
    gpsmout
    Member

    Thanks for all the advice!
    I will read and absorb.

    Graham

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