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  • #4515
    Kilda
    Participant

    Could anyone please tell me the best length for oars in a wayfarer please?

    #11172
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    As long as possible because of the relative high gunwales of a Wayfarer. But for practical reasons, cut them to length so they can be stored along side the CB case and just fit between the aft and forward bulkheads.

    #11176
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    Tell me Bert, any reason not to use long, split oars ??? And I mean split in half, not down the middle!!!! Der!
    ps, If you have a Mk4, your oars can be as long as the boat !!

    #11177
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Maybe you know something that I don’t? I have not come across a reliable mechanism yet that connects the two parts of an oar. But I have to admit that I am no longer an expert. I sold my oars seven years ago in favour of a simple paddle and an iron jib. I found oars to much trouble and too slow. While stowed I tripped over them one time to many. That was just before I gave them a swimming lesson. 😈

    Over here “no engine, canvas oilskin” purists cruisers prefer a punting pole over oars. Years ago we were caught by a calm and we tried to row our way back to port. I was the laughing stock of the fleet that passed me left and right using their punting skills or engines. When the thunderstorm arrived we were the only boat left on the lake……

    #11178
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    So you felt a bit of a drip then!!! 😆
    So is a punting pole the same length as an oar i wonder, not that its up my street you understand.
    Split oars look like they are just slotted together but im sure they have some way to hold them together.
    CP

    #11179
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Punting poles are much longer, 5 yards or so. We stow them upright along a shroud using two steel wire loops.

    #11181

    I fitted rowlocks and 8ft oars to my Mk1, and always found the boat perfectly good to row.
    I then transferred them over to my new W, a world, and whilst it is still workable it is nowhere near as good. I think perhaps the thwart is lower?
    9ft oars would be better, but I couldn’t afford them at the time.

    #11182
    matoi
    Member

    There are robust 3-part oars made by Carlisle, meant for river rafting.
    For the World: 9.5 foot model with counterweights is good for rowing. You might need to have custom rowlocks made in order to avoid the oars rubbing on the gunwale.
    Bare in mind that a pair of these is heavy.
    If budget allows, a better combination for stink-free cruising aid might be a small electric outboard and a pair of short/light paddles…

    #11183
    Kilda
    Participant

    Thank you all so much for an entertaining and cofusing read, i have come to the conclusion that selling our 2 two stroke smokers and investing in a suzuki 2.5 four stroke along with the aforementioned ‘light paddles’ as used by canadian canoeists may be favourite,
    Thanks again! Kilda.
    p.s. punt? splints for the shrouds? Lazy afternoons wearing straw hats and eating cornetto’s aint Wayfaring to me but thanks for the 😆

    #11184
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    We have some 8ft Plastimo oars which work well (in terms of seating position) in a Mk2 for example, although I had to adjust the collar positions slightly from new to bring them a little closer to the narrow end (otherwise my hands were too far apart). I have rowed some distance with them, but now tend to go with a combination of outboard and wooden paddle(s). I wouldn’t be without at least one paddle, always immediately accessible – you can use them to fend off, to reach a dangling main halyard, or to propel you through a wind shadow under a bridge perhaps, and they easily fit into the boat. Highly recommended, provided they are long enough…

    #11189
    Kilda
    Participant

    @Dave Barker wrote:

    We have some 8ft Plastimo oars which work well (in terms of seating position) in a Mk2 for example, although I had to adjust the collar positions slightly from new to bring them a little closer to the narrow end (otherwise my hands were too far apart). I have rowed some distance with them, but now tend to go with a combination of outboard and wooden paddle(s). I wouldn’t be without at least one paddle, always immediately accessible – you can use them to fend off, to reach a dangling main halyard, or to propel you through a wind shadow under a bridge perhaps, and they easily fit into the boat. Highly recommended, provided they are long enough…

    Great, thanks Dave.
    I recently spotted Cockle on a you tube film, looks great, may see you next year when i have finished replacing the transome in ‘Wotnot again’. Composite so its a pain!

    #11397
    Roger
    Participant

    Is there any film on-line anywhere of a Wayfarer being rowed?

    #11407

    How about this variation on the theme: 8ft oars will fit in the cockpit of a Mk 1 (Dear Old Ian Proctor designed the floor to be a single sheet of ply – like the gent he was) but there seems to be a preference for slightly longer oars (or is that just the W World?), which won’t go. Then I see sweibertje is suggesting keeping gurt long punting poles on the shrouds. Presumably these are pretty thick and this set me thinking – why not stow oars on the sides of the mast or on the shrounds? Even with 8 ft oars this gets them out from under your feet for the 95% of the time you aren’t using them. too much windage? hostage to fortune in any other sense? what do we think?

    cheers folks

    Boris W6330 Delphy

    PS I looked into getting the carlisle oars mentioned by matoi – lordy goodness they are pricey – approx £450 shipped from the US: you can get a new outboard for that!

    #11408
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    I have just Googled Carbon oars, im sure one of the many makers must have an answer for this problem/
    Yes they would cost but you would only buy them ones and they would have along life, be light and if made to split could be stored in a shorter length.
    You could also have a set with the class tent to hire!!
    CP

    #11409
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    Came across a company from the USA who sell in the Uk some rafting paddles which maybe of use.
    Carlisle Paddle Gear, look under Boating and Rafting gear.
    They have an oar that comes in a long length and when the blade is added it makes 9ft, the blade is 26in long so the long part is just less than 7ft which would fit down the box side in the cockpit.
    CP

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