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  • #5222
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I have a Yamaha 2.5 and found that the prop was a little high, so I turned the wooden mounting block on the bracket upside down and that works wonderfully.

    #5312
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    In case this is of any use to anyone else I thought I would give a little feedback based on recent experience with my newly-fitted Yamaha 2.5 and bracket.

    I decided to fit the bracket on the starboard side of the boat, to make the throttle more central in the boat – it’s on the left/port side of the engine. The disadvantage of this, with the Yamaha at least, is that the fuel shut-off and the gear lever are both on the other side. (The fuel control is quite far back too, so this is the least accessible of the major controls). It’s just a case of weighing up the pros and cons for any given engine and its controls. On balance I think I would recommend the port side for this engine – the throttle arm is so short that it barely reaches into the boat, so there’s no way it will cause a space problem either way.

    The instructions supplied with the bracket (Boats ‘n’ Bits) were good, and the final position of the bracket was very close to the recommended one in terms of offset and height, just on the opposite side of the transom! The main issues are avoiding the normal rudder positions clashing with the prop – literally – and keeping the prop in the water without being unnecessarily deep, which increases drag. A lower bracket position would also put the front of the engine too close to the upper edge of the transom (where the traveller track is mounted) when the engine is in its sailing position, flipped up. However, if the engine is mounted too high up it will be clipped by the boom if you have the kicker on hard…

    Although the rudder is well clear of the prop in normal use, in very shallow water with a raised rudder the prop can snag on the rudder as I have proved to my own (dis)satisfaction. 😥

    In summary, consider how you will use the engine and the issues will become clear.

    #5331
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi, I’m the one who started this thread.
    I finally bought a second-hand Honda BF2 on e-bay.
    The standard-shaft is just OK – with the dinghy completely unloaded the cavitation plate is a couple of inches underwater. When the boat is loaded for cruising, I expect it to be about right.

    New subject – does anybody have any recommendations for petrol-stoves? I want to use the same fuel the motor to avoid carrying mutiple-tanks.

    Keith

    #5333
    PeterW3035
    Member

    I used my Mariner 3.3 for the first time on the Solent rally and was very impressed with not only the engine but also the bracket. Certainly the short shaft works well and the engine pushed us along very easily at quarter throttle. Works very easily clamped straight ahead with rudder and tiller to steer with me lounging on the floor boards in the sun.

    It would be interesting to know quite how foul a tide you could motor against if needed, there certainly seemed to be lots of power left if we had needed it.

    We only had one ocassion on the way home when the mainsheet caught around the outboard, but this seemed to be helmsman error by just having too much main sheet flying about as we tacked.

    Peter
    W3035

    #5334
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Peter……..Wouldn’t like to guess the strength of tide but once I was very impressed how much progress my outboard made against a foul tide………until I ran out of fuel………….suprise suprise……….consumption really goes up with the tide against…………so back up oars came out and I worked like mad ………to stay still………could have refuelled but was so just short of the hard ended up accepting a tow off a rib! The amount of load (children, food, camping gear) obviously also makes a huge difference. Dave

    #5335
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi keith……..I use a Colemans stove with unleaded petrol and love it(fishing shops seem the best stockists)………Colemans do recommend their own fuel but petrol is fine. The issue is using petrol for the stove and the outboard and at what point you mix in oil (my 2 stroke uses 50:1). As a veteran of two overnights (!) I just took two separate gallon tanks (one petrol one mixed)on the basis if I need to make up more outboard fuel I can, but I wanted a decent amount already mixed up in case of needing to refuel on the open sea where spillages or contamination while mixing want to be avoided. As usual I never even needed to top up the outboard. Dave

    #5336
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Dave, the Honda BF2 is a 4-stoke, so no mixing needed.
    Which model Coleman have you got, or is there only one?

    Keith

    #5337
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Keith…….no mixing is certainly a blessing………..the effort to avoid contaminating fuel and oily funnels with the amount of sand that accumulates with beach toys is a hassle…..and taking just one gallon tank would be great. ( The other benefit is that fuel goes stale and sometimes I have pre-mixed fuel I need to get rid of as I have no faith in it…..now I have a deisel car it will be harder to find someone elses car to put the stale fuel into (if they know its 50:1)……..all this is detail you really want to know!)

    as to the coleman it is a 508A single ring stove from about 1992….but I have seen the same thing in the shops recently….the reason I mention fishing shops is that for replacement parts for my colemans lantern I struggled until I scored on the Internet with a Tackle shop in Kent…….

    ….the stove gets superbly hot……….it will slide on thwarts and locker tops if you are not careful…….I take it for a brew at the boat yard after we have picnicked and drained the thermoses during the day. Perfick!

    #5338
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    At the recent Calshot rally, I learned three things.

    1. A short shaft engine will spin out of the water if the crew are not sat in the right paces, and frequently too

    2. A 2HP motor is not sufficient when sailing on the sea at UKWA events. You may be asked to tow a buddy!

    3. Always take a can of spare fuel or the engine may run dry!!!!!!

    That is the beauty of the Wayfarer, there is so much to learn and talk about. And having this site is the icing on the cake. Well done Bob.

    The theme of the insert picture is UST + 1 hour = BST….HA HA! 😀

    #5346
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @PeterW3035 wrote:

    It would be interesting to know quite how foul a tide you could motor against if needed, there certainly seemed to be lots of power left if we had needed it.

    Now lets exercise the grey matter between our ears a bit shall we?

    When motoring it is unlikely a Wayfarer will go any faster then its hull speed, unless we put 15 HP on her transom. But I don’t think a Wayfarer could take the weight and the power of a 15 HP motor, but that is beside the point I am trying to make. Lets just assume that no motor will push your boat above its hull speed.

    The hull speed is relative to the water surrounding you (as opposed to relative to the shore). Imagine you are sailing in a big swimming pool. Current is the same as moving the swimming pool around. Since your hull speed is relative to the water surrounding you, current has no effect what so ever on the hull speed. The only thing current has an influence on is your navigation.

    If you have a current against you, running at the same speed as your boat’s hull speed, tough luck! No matter how powerful an engine you mount you will not get home until after the tide changes. In other words, a motor has no effect on current whatsoever. It does not help you get home against the tide. I is a sailing aid, not a navigation aid and as such it helps you sail home without sails and also straight against the wind, that is all.

    We had this discussion a few months ago on the Yahoo group. Parts of that discussion are now on the WIT pages of the Canadian web site.

    #5347
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @Dave Barker wrote:

    On balance I think I would recommend the port side for this engine – the throttle arm is so short that it barely reaches into the boat, so there’s no way it will cause a space problem either way.

    First of all you want your bracket as far away from the rudder as possible. Second every motor has a tendency to turn from its center position due to internal torque. Depending on its turning direction a motor has a tendency to turn clockwise or counter clockwise. You could turn the wing nut that keeps the motor from turning till breaking point but the motor will still slowly turn away from its center position. Better is to have a short piece of rope from the motors helm to a clam-cleat just below the transom (below the transom to avoid it catching the main sheet). The line prevents the motor from turning off its center line and the cleat helps you adjusting it to an exact straight course. In real life this means the motor points slightly offset from the boats center line to compensate its wheel effect.

    Most motors have a tendency to torque clockwise. In that case and if you have the motor mounted port side you need “moving-air-screws” to fix the cleat. Unfortunately “moving-air-screws” have yet to be invented. It is far easier to mount the motor starboard side and have a cleat screwed in the transom somewhere port of the boats center line. Obviously if you have a motor that tends to turn counter clockwise it should be mounted port with a cleat starboard from the center line.

    The anti-torque line, when strong enough, doubles as a safety line, preventing the motor from taking deep sea diving lessons.

    #5348
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @jim wrote:

    2. A 2HP motor is not sufficient when sailing on the sea at UKWA events. You may be asked to tow a buddy!

    I have regularly towed two boats with my Suzuki 2.2. And Isis (W10290) has done the same with a Honda 2.2. But I could not do it with my old motor, a 40 year old Christler 3.5 HP.

    It is not all about HP but also about efficiency and the type of screw. Since the boat speed of a Wayfarer is limited (hull speed) I had a “work” screw mounted from the start. If you buy a new motor this can usually be done at no extra cost. A “work” screw delivers more torque at the cost of a lower top speed. As long as you can reach hull speed with a “work” screw it is OK and you have the added torque for towing.

    #5356
    aidanw
    Member

    Related but slightly different question….

    When towing another boat when motoring where do you attach the tow rope to on a standard Wayferer? I would be very reluctant to tie to around the traveller / horse thingy at the back of the boat.

    Being towed is easier – a couple of turns around the mast and hold the rope but I’m not so sure about towing without having something secure ready set up to attach a tow rope to.

    Cheers

    Aidan

    #5360
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @AidanW wrote:

    When towing another boat when motoring where do you attach the tow rope to on a standard Wayferer?

    I have two alloy open base cleats (4″ or 5″ size) on the front of the aft bulkhead, just above the benches. They are fixed with four 5mm bolts each and a counter plate inside the tank. They are strong enough for a tow rope. But also:

    – They are easy to reach mooring cleats. I have mooring lines permanently attached to them (through the open base with a figure eight knot).
    – The open base serves also as a sheet eye for the try sail (my Genoa has a bolt rope).
    – They hold a bungee loop in place that I use to fix the helm if I am shorthanded.
    – The bungee loop can also be hooked to the main sheet block at the apex of the bridle rope, pullling it in during a gybe, thus preventing the main sheet from wrapping around the outboard.
    – They can be used to attach an emergancy bridle for the main sheet, should the bridle at the transom break.
    – Finally they are great to tie everyting down (mast and boom) if riding a F11 behind a drone (read “Ocean Crossing Wayfarer” by Frank Dye for details).

    #5362
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    AidanW wrote:

    When towing another boat when motoring where do you attach the tow rope to on a standard Wayferer?

    I have a bridle that I attach to the handles set into the side decks at the rear.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 31 total)
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