Latest News: Forums Technical Mainsheet Arrangement

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  • #4376
    TimTownsend
    Participant

    My Wayfarer has the standard racing mainsheet setup, that is to say, the mainsheet is dead ended on the end of the boom, leads down to a block on the bridle, back up to a block on the boom and then leads forward to another block halfway along the boom before finishing at a ratchet block and swivel jammer on the centreboard case aft of the thwart.

    I’ve never seen a Wayfarer with a split mainsheet which are popular, if not almost universally used, in in Scorpions, GP14’s, Fireballs and 505’s. With the powerful kicking strap arrangements which are now possible, why don’t Wayfarer sailors use such an arrangement? Surely the mainsheet loads must be less than in the 505 and Fireball, and not significantly more than in the Scorpion and GP?

    #10486
    Dave8181
    Member

    I fitted a split mainsheet system to my Wayfarer for racing. Eventually however I refitted a standard mainsheet so as to have lower sheet loads in high winds, and to have more control over sail fullness, by being able to tension the leech using the mainsheet as well as the kicking strap.

    #10488
    Fantasia
    Member

    I too have fitted a split mainsheet in the past and have likewise reverted to the system described above. The 2:1 purchase made sheeting in quick at the leeward mark and I did not notice too much additional sheet tension when close hauled (combined with 16:1 kicker), but it did need quite a bit of adjustment in the length of the strops so that the boom was centred without applying too much tension to the leech in light winds. I knicked the idea from a Scorp, which all seem to have them, but they also have raking rigs so I am not quite sure how that works. Now that you have mentioned it, I might give it another go this year and see how I get on.

    #10491
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    I have the last end of the mainsheet on the boom detachable so if its light i take it off for one to one and put it on for strong winds to make the two to one thats needed.CP

    #10498
    TimTownsend
    Participant

    Thanks, everybody, for your replies. I’ll probably give the split mainsheet a go (but won’t throw away the existing bridle, block, and longer mainsheet). My guess is that if it’s too windy to trim the mainsheet, I shouldn’t be out sailing, but should be in the bar instead.

    #10499
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    Try not to miss out on the strong winds Tim! The Wayfarer being the big hulk it is, they are the best times to enjoy the highest speeds the boat can do and still be pretty stable as well!!
    When you get the boat moving and you avoid running into the wave in front, the surge that comes from a Wayfarer at speed is like running as fast as you can before the chasing dog bites you on the transom and you fall flat on your face!!
    Throw the dog a few treats and your leave him in your wake !!
    CP

    #10509
    TimTownsend
    Participant

    Colin, you’re right. The Wayfarer is best sailed when its blowing dogs off chains! What I meant was that if it is blowing 25+ knots, and I can’t pull the mainsail in, then I should be in the bar. If it’s blowing 15-20 knots and I can’t pull the mainsail in, then I should be in the gym!

    #10588
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    in the bar when you could be sailing !!!… just reef the main and enjoy the swell… its heck of a lot cheaper to feel sick doing that than over endulging

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