Latest News: Forums Cruising How readily do Wafarers get swamped or capsize on moorings?

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  • #4602
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi All, As I do more cruising I will increasingly leave the boat on big-boat cruiser moorings in exposed anchorages. Please assess my asssumptions: Best practice to survive difficult sea conditions: 1. Sound cordage. 2. good bow fairlead, mooring rope lashed into fairlead with chafe considered. 3. Tie the mooring rope back around the mast. 4. Reduce windage as much as possible. 5. Lift board all the way – boat wil yaw and roll but won’t “trip” on the board. 6. Lash down anything internally. Okay, al fine so far…now try…. 7. Without a cover, rain can fill the boat completely – opening the bailers will at least let the boat float, if very low in the water (my Plus-S has a bilge rather than a double bottom). 8. Big seas can also swamp the boat, so, again, leaving the bailers open is good practice. ….or; better to shut evertthing and if the boat is on a mooring for 2 or 3 days, it will be fine. Or get a simple cover; even a flat one over the cockpit? Do Wayfaers ever capsize on moorings? Thanks for any advice. Jeremy Warren

    #11638
    Fundoctor
    Member

    Jeremy

    A little to add. I parked my Mk2 on a yacht mooring off Lundy Island where it was exposed to an Easterly 4-6 and shortish 1m waves for 36 hours. It was alarming to see the angle through which the top of the mast was moving as it tossed about – 60-70degs – mb more. But I was amazed when I got a lift back out, that there was hardly a drop of water inside (it had not rained). I’d rather leave mine to take its chances with rain, unless I thought prolonged torrential rain was coming, than leave the bailers open. One other point for me – I can get seasick when in a stationary boat on a mooring in waves. When I was so caught on Lundy, I couldn’t rig the boat on the mooring but motored her to more sheltered waters pronto. Obviously the best trick is not to moor or anchor in exposed situations but sometimes that is not possible – for me that particular day I was sailing solo and bottled out of tackling the tidal races at each end of the island that would have led me round to the sheltered west side.

    Be interested to hear what ‘Farers say about CB position at mooring. Does some CB down help keep her to wind?

    Trevor
    Osprey 9002 (Mk2)

    #11640

    My original Wayfarer (Mk I) lived on a mooring for months at a time, as did several other Ws local to me. The moorings were behind a causeways so did not suffer from a big fetch and waves, but could see a fair bit of wind.
    We always put the boards up, primarily because we were on running moorings. The boats would yaw and rock a lot, but it was very rare for seawater to get aboard. Rain was another matter.
    I once was unable to attend the boat for about three weeks, and due to accumulated rainwater plus some severe weather, she capsized on the mooring. At the time I was actually using a borrowed yacht mooring which was probably slightly more exposed.

    If you were looking for a bomb-proof way of mooring a Wayfarer, you could always drop the mast (space and traffic permitting) and then it would be very, very hard to imagine it capsizing.

    #11641
    Scorrie
    Member

    Picking up on what No Disgrace posted regarding possible removal of masts when mooring:

    It is quite surprising how much the wind can turn a bare mast into a giant lever to heel a boat over. In a couple of the marinas up here (Shetland) mast removal if preferred during the winter months. Not because of damage to the yachts, but because the boats heel and twist so much on the floating finger pontoons that the finger pontoon fixings get badly damaged.

    #11643
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    But if there is just half a slipway you better get yourself a decent trolley. With it taking the boat out is child’s play.
    Rigging and de-rigging is also so much easier ashore. Ashore your boat lasts longer and requires far less maintenance.
    Put her on a mooring only if there is no other alternative.

    #11649

    @Swiebertje wrote:

    But if there is just half a slipway you better get yourself a decent trolley. With it taking the boat out is child’s play.
    Rigging and de-rigging is also so much easier ashore. Ashore your boat lasts longer and requires far less maintenance.
    Put her on a mooring only if there is no other alternative.

    Each to their own. I’m not a particularly large person and as a result even on a good slipway singlehanded launch/recovery is completely impossible unless I can make use of a car to provide the muscle. Even then, getting the boat onto a trolley in a cross or onshore wind is extremely tricky.
    As a result, my long term plan is to fix the niggling leaks in my World and then leave her on a sheltered running mooring.
    I found I was far more likely to use the boat for opportunistic wee sails when she was already in the water.

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