Latest News: Forums Cruising Electric outboard

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  • #3571
    Tonym
    Member

    Has anyone any experience or opinions on selecting an electric outboard for a Wayfarer. Power, preferred manufacturer, duration of use etc ?

    I sail in the Lake District and a quiet motor appeals on several levels. Limited use to inland fresh water.

    Comments welcome

    #5780

    Electric motors are used by the thinner members of my fishing club (the rest of us row to get a good workout). They are effective in calm conditions but need to be supplemented by oar power to make headway against a gale (known here in Ireland as a “good fishing breeze”).

    The main problem is the weight of the batteries. You need too heavy duty leisure batteries for a day’s fishing. For advice turn to your local tackle shop – electric motors are used by anglers.

    Gordon

    #5783

    I’m really interested in the idea of an electric outboard – we’ve just been walking along the Thames, and the idea of coming down it in a Wayfarer (without mast …) is very appealing.

    If the use is only to go with the stream, say on the Thames or the Broads, an electric outboard seems ideal.

    I look forward to other posts …

    Richard

    #5785

    For a Thames cruise a little advance planning would allow you to moor close to a riverside pub every evening – having phoned beforehand to find out whether they will let you charge your batteries.

    Gordon

    #5787
    Tonym
    Member

    I have been doing some more research since my original post. as pointed out by Gordon earlier in this thread electric outboards seem very popular in the states and amomgst anglers who use them as silent positioning or trolling auxiliary motors, often with a petrol outboard for actual travelling.

    They are very low horsepower, and figures quoted for them are thrust. speaking to a dealer he suggested that 40 – 46 ilb opf thrust should tootle a wayfarer along – but do not expect to be punching a wind or current.

    Seem to be Ok for 1- 2 hours tootling at moderate throttle off a 12v battery. good for getting back to mooring when the wind drops ? or taking kids out on a wind free day. The battery is external to the motor – basically you need find somewhere to securely stow a car battery sized lump. Although dealer advice was to ensure you get a deep cycle marine leisure battery.

    Only reallly viable if you can ensure a recharge connection every day you use it and for most of us I suspect that means taking battery out of boat every time. I am still considering it for my purposes, although if you travel about much with your boat petrol is more easily obtained, gives you more power to make headway. Also more noise/pollution) . It’s a balancing act.

    DYOR

    Tonym

    #5788
    W10143
    Member

    Tony

    An excellent review in PBO August 2007, No 488, of 3 electric outboards; one of them the torqueedo http://www.torqeedo.com/en/hn/home.html appears to come out tops in both performance and price (3x 2.2HP Outboards!) but has its own integral battery. Dealers at http://www.cquip.com/Page.php?id=186

    HTH
    David

    #5789
    Tonym
    Member

    Gosh they’r re expensive !

    other models I have looked at are sub £400 – 300 pounds.

    the torqeedo is £1000 plus !

    would someone care to post the pther two models reviewed ?

    thanks

    #5790
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @W10143 wrote:

    Tony

    An excellent review in PBO August 2007, No 488, of 3 electric outboards; one of them the torqueedo http://www.torqeedo.com/en/hn/home.html appears to come out tops in both performance and price (3x 2.2HP Outboards!) but has its own integral battery. Dealers at http://www.cquip.com/Page.php?id=186

    HTH
    David

    Lets try some simple physics:

    2.2 HP equals 1.6 KW. Aside from differences in efficiency a 2.2HP compares to a 1.6 kw electric. Such a motor draws 62 Amps from a 24 volts battery. You need an expensive lithium battery of 77 Ah or a cheaper lead-acid of 120 Ah to run the electric motor for an hour. The Li-on battery weighs 18 kg according to torqueedo’s web site. A lead acid is much heavier. The torqueedo 2 Kw (equals to 83 amp @ 24 v) motor weighs 18 kg according to the same web site. hence you carry 36 kg around to motor for one hour.

    A Honda 2.2 four-stroke weighs 11 kg and runs an hour on one liter of fuel. A liter of fuel weighs about 800 grams……..

    In addition I carry a jerrycan with 5 liters of fuel with me. That is good for another 5 hours motoring and it weighs only 4 kg.

    And what about the copper wires thick as your thumb, and the expensive power electronics to handle such currents.

    Now for costs…..

    #5791
    W10143
    Member

    Swiebertje

    I was in no way endorsing Electric power, having discarded that option some time ago in favour of (like you) a Suzuki 2.2 2stroke; However…. should anyone wish to go (for whatever reason) down that route, I posted the article source for sound advice.

    David

    #5795
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    @W10143 wrote:

    Swiebertje

    I was in no way endorsing Electric power, having discarded that option some time ago in favour of (like you) a Suzuki 2.2 2stroke; However…. should anyone wish to go (for whatever reason) down that route, I posted the article source for sound advice.

    David

    It is nothing personal David, it is just that these electric motor web sites make it pretty hard to get the characteristic. They seem to love to hide the data or present them in a way the average sailor can’t understand. There must be a reason for that….
    Anyway there is nothing wrong with using ones own common sense and a little high school physics to discover the dark side of an electric motor.

    Until now I have only seen one sensible application of electric motors on boats. That was in hire boats in the Amsterdan canals where the balast was replaced by (many) batteries. They carry a total of about 1500 Ah+ (24V) of batteries abord and are intended for a party of up to six tourists at 5 km/h max. They need to be recharged all night after ten hours of use. Because the batteries replace ballast, the weight to energy ratio is much better than we could ever achieve with a wayfarer. Imagine the weight and volume of the batteries….

    BTW, against my better judgment I have sold my Susuki and switched to a Honda 2.2 because of better low rev behaviour. I am still not shure if I made the right descision though. The Suzuki was very easy to maintain and also I could recover it from a capsize with nothing more then a sparkplug key and a screwdriver. But when five other Wayfarer sailors keep trying to convince me for more then two years to get a Honda….. Wel you know….

    #5796

    If money is not a consideration (dream on) then an electric motor witha fuel cell to recharge the battery would probably work.

    IMHO electric motors are reserved for waters like canals, rivers and broads where silence is a major element of the enjoyment of the landscape…birdwatching or approaching surface feeding fish is not possible with a petrol motor.

    Gordon

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