Latest News: Forums Cruising Coastal Jacket and Trousers for cruising

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  • #4351
    revoli
    Member

    Does anyone use normal Coastal gear for cruising? I realise a dry suit is the ultimate answer but Icannot help thinking I would getmore use from something like the Gul Vigo Coastal jacket and trousers currently on sale. It seems to have some sort of seal described as almost dry? Views anyone for a novice working towards cruising capability. Thx

    #10316
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Basically you dress to the temperature of the water, you have to consider capsizing! Obviously this means a change of clothes for the summer. In general yachting clothes do not protect much when you are in the water. Also they tend to limit your freedom of movement in a dinghy (or while swimming). Remember that for the same reasons you don’t use a life vest but a swimming aid. A dry suit has no thermal insulation, your survival depends on what you wear underneath. Also it depends on not tearing a hole in it, something that is hard to do on a dinghy.

    I have followed the wind surfers trend and wear a titanium lined base layer under a wet suit (in my case neoprene hikers). In summer the titanium base layer is replaced by a lycra rash top and in between I sometimes use a polypropylene (fleece) base layer. A wet suit (or hikers) will still do its job when damaged and allow full freedom of movement. Then I have the option to use a spray top to prevent wind chill. To top it of I use a cap (summer) or a beanie, mainly to protect myself from the sun. And finally, when it is really cold, I may choose to use rubber kitchen gloves (supermarket) over fleece gloves (el cheapo from Lidl). On my feet are neoprene hiking boots, always, because they provide the best anti-slip and allow me to walk in the water while launching without getting cold feet. In winter a pair of titanium lined socks are available but I have yet to use them.

    Andah, Colin, thanks for your pointer, these Rooster hikers are perfect for this garden gnome.

    #10321
    revoli
    Member

    Thanks for that. How do you find the wetsuit after a couple of days cruising? Once wet on a cruise presumably they just stay wet until you get hone to dry them out. I have memories of coming out of the water like a shrivelled up grape after a days surfing in a wet suit. Like the kitchen glove solution.

    #10324
    Swiebertje
    Participant

    That is why I have switched to a hiking pants, fleece and a breathable dry top. They are almost as good as a full wet suit IMHO. By choosing different combinations I have solutions for every season and weather. Maybe you should have a look at the video’s on the Rooster sails web site? I got their stuff thanks to another Wayfarer sailor and so far I am very pleased with it.

    The hikers (or wetsuit) inside out on a raised spinnaker pole for 15 minutes usually gets them dry again provided it’s not raining.

    Best gloves I ever had: long sleeved rubber gloves as used in the chemical industry. These gloves are much longer then kitchen gloves and tight (waterproof) around the arms while wide at the wrist and hands. This gives good isolation and keeps my the hands dry and warm even without fleece gloves inside. Kitchen gloves are a poor replacement but work pretty well to. Don’t buy those leather sailing gloves with cut of fingers. Though better at handling ropes, once they get wet they are cold and stay cold for ever.

    #10325

    HI
    I race all year round in a laser and agree that if you are getting wet then just hikers with a rash vest , one of roosters aquafleeces and a good pair of boots is more than sufficient in the summer … in the winter i wear a 3/2mm profile wet suit underneath my hikers with a thermal rash vest .This means that you can go in and still be able to train/race after as the materials probably work better when they are damp .

    However i do some pottering around in a wayfarer and as i am confident enough in myself that i will not capsize as i will only sail in suitable weather conditions or de-power the sail i wear standard coastal keel boat clothing : Oilyes , Henri Lloyd smock and yachting boots , so far this has proven to be the best for me as it is defiantly more comfortable than a dry suit , almost as waterproof ( ensuring you don’t go in the water ) and much easier as getting ready takes 5 mins .

    The main advantage of cruising in coastal gear is that if it gets to hot you can take the smock or jacket off and just have a tee-shirt on top , the comfort is unbeatable , and a good pair will dry out in 20mins left in the sun or a keen breeze.Also for the winter some good thermals such as the type used for skiing are ideal to wear underneath .

    #10326
    revoli
    Member

    Thanks all this is very informative. Health issues are preventing me doing anything other than pottering on my lOcal pond at mo but I am gearing up for a spring launch so will look at suggested kit. At the end of the day what you seem to be saying is dress for the conditions and sail plan. Thx

    #10327
    Bob Harland
    Participant

    Clothing for cruising is completely different to racing. It is all about being comfortable whilst out sailing for several hours at a time – even sailing all day and perhaps all night.
    During that time conditions may change and the clothing needs to be able to change accordingly. The crew will also need to eat, drink and the rest.

    For these reasons yachting jackets and trousers are my preferred choice. In recent years the sport-boat range have appeared and I find these perfect for the Wayfarer. Salopette trousers and a smock or jacket. The material is lightweight and easy to move around wearing them, easy to put on and take off .

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