Latest News: Forums Technical Centre Main Sheeting

This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Swiebertje 3 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #21123

    Ketchup 8819
    Participant

    hi I’m new to class having bought 8819, a mkII. She is currently set up for stern main sheeting and one of the first things I want to do is convert to centre main, I was wondering if anyone could give advice and post images of the blocks used and how they stop the main from sagging onto the helm.

    #21138

    jmcc500
    Participant

    Hi Ketchup,

    I have a Mk 4 so can’t help too much with the specifics of your boat. On the Mk 4, the mainsheet passes through a loop halfway between the rear block and the centre block on the boom, so does not sag on that run (if that is what you mean). The main then comes down to a ratchet block with cam cleat mounted to the rear of the centreboard case. It seems to work well, but I have not sailed a boat with rear sheeting to compare.

    Hope this is vaguely helpful, it’s pretty quiet on this forum I am afraid!

    James

    #21141

    Swiebertje
    Participant

    Four inches of garden hose will keep the sheet up as well and it is soft should you bump your head against it. Taper the ends at 45 degrees to allow the hose to be screwed or a pop-riveted to the bottom of the boom. Rivets are best, self threading screws need to be taken out after their initial thread cutting. File the screws points off and re-insert. This is to avoid damage to control lines that run inside the boom.

    I am not in favour of ratchets and cleats. Ratchets take much of the ‘feel’ away and cleats can be hazardous because you do not feel gust coming. Also you are always too late to un-cleat and let go to prevent a capsize.

    But if you must, adjust (bend) your cleats in such a way that a normal pull will always un-cleat your sheet. The cleat should grab the sheet only of you pull it from an unusual low angle.

    Visit a Wayfarer event, bring a camera, examine the other boats and take many pictures of rigging details. I promise that you will be looking at those pictures many times. You may also notice that the Wayfarer sailors are a nice bunch, always willing to explain their solutions. It is in my opinion, the best school for learning to rig a Wayfarer and it is fun too.

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