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  • #3789
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I recently purchased a compo Mk 1 s/n 2714 the last build by someone in 1970. The washers on the bolt are perished, but when I ordered new ones from Trident they supplied thin rubber washers the size of the steel penny washer. The Wayfarer book (CD) shows a drawing of a FLANGED BUSH which looks like mine, but no-one seems to have heard of such a thing – even Ian Porter. Has anyone any info about a supplier? At the moment the nuts are fully tightened and await a mastic overlay for want of better.

    Another point on reefing – My main is centre sheeted which does not allow rolling – but a Trotter I had in the 60s had a claw mainsheet attachment which did. Any views? I did find with roller reefing that the boom dropped, and I was considering a slab system I am familiar with on large boats in the Med with a cringle at the tack onto a hook, and a reefing pennant to an cringle on the clew, perhaps an extension to the outhaul. Any views would be appreciated. I do not race.

    #7265
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Hi,

    I reckon you need something more like a really fat ‘O’ ring or thick neoprene washer with a stainless washer outside it, so that you can pinch it up fairly tightly and get a good seal. I’m afraid I can’t give you a specific supplier though.

    Regarding the reefing, I recommend slab reefing. Most cruisers seem to have this type of system and I can vouch for it working well. There are alternatives to a hook at the tack, but I use a hook system and it works for me. For the clew a typical Wayfarer slab reefing system would have a reefing line leading from a fixed point on or under the boom up through the cringle, back down to a block where the line turns forward and along the boom via a clamcleat or similar near the gooseneck end of the boom, finally turning down via another block for a comfortable angle of pull (i.e. straight downwards). This enables you to reef (and shake out a reef) from one position in the boat, typically on the starboard side (putting you on starboard tack whilst reefing). At last year’s Tidal Training w/e about ten boats with slab reefing similar to this each tried putting in a reef against the clock and as I recall everyone took less than 2 minutes from start to finish, some much less.

    Mounting the aft block on a slider under the boom rather than rivetting it to the side of the boom allows you to make fine adjustments so as to obtain approximately a 45 degree angle of pull downwards and outwards, which is ideal, maintaining tension in the foot whilst holding the sail down on the boom.

    You may want to have 2 or 3 earrings (small cringles) fitted between the luff and clew cringles to accomodate ties or bungees so as to be able to tidy away the portion of the sail which becomes redundant once you have reefed. (Don’t bother with any of these beyond about halfway back along the sail, as you won’t be able to reach them safely from within the boat when afloat.)

    I hope this description isn’t too confusing!

    Cheers!

    #7266
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Dave – that was extremely helpful – particularly in respect of the reefing which obviates any change to the , and the clear instructions

    As to the bolt – I think you have the solution there – I just wonder whether it will matter if the bolt hole is oversize for the insertion of a bush.

    I will get a piece of neoprene and cut the washer from it and see how that goes.

    Many thanks and kind regards – Bill

    #7267
    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Bill – Having looked in the book (which I should have done in the first place!) I see what you mean about the flanged bush. Unless you’re going anywhere distant imminently in the boat I think I would be tempted to try using a simple neoprene washer or similar and take it from there. With any luck it will work without additional components.

    Best of luck.

    #7268
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    Bill,
    Please do not be tempted to over tighten the bolt on a GRP centreboard box.

    The Wayfarer has a thinner centreboard than the width of the box and if you do over tighten the bolt it can crack the box side to floor joint!!!!

    I have seen this and its not a happy place to repair.

    You can pack the centreboard out to the box width,even just in the area of the bolt hole will be good.

    CP 😀

    #7269
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Dave – thank you – I will follow your advice.

    Colin – a very good point – I will be aware of that now. I have noticed that the top gel coat has parted here and there from the fibre-glass moulding in the corners, or reveals of the CB housing. Should I chip back to where there is adhesion and re-coat with gel – or just fill the gaps with epoxy? Have to get the board out this winter and do what you suggest. I don’t think the cracks are dangerous, buit I have yet to float the boat without floorboards to check for leaks.

    Cheers to both – Bill

    #7270
    Colin Parkstone
    Participant

    Bill, No Problem!!

    If I understand you correctly,the gel you are talking about is the “Flow Coat ” that is put on the bare glassfibre on the inside of the hull to stop water ingress into the GRP.

    This sometimes is paint instead?

    Its often flowed over the top of mouldings that have not been abraded and so just peels off at a later date.

    This can just be chipped off the moulding as it has no use.

    If you do decide to re “Flow Coat ” the inside of the hull,remember that it must be well cleaned and the Flow coat should be the proper stuff,not just gel.
    Gel is made to be sticky on the open side so that glassfibre will stick to it when moulding,Flow Coat does not and has styreen in it so that it goes hard and clean like a paint finnish.

    CP 😀

    #7273

    Hi Sujabi, If you go further back in this forum to a string on april 12 2007 entitled ‘very very stiff centreboard etc’ you can read the helpful advice all the wayfarer gang gave to W6610 concerning bolts and washers etc. It involves Grolsch lager as well, and the bolt and c’board have worked beautifully ever since. Softish washers that will compress but not stress the casing is what is needed. Have a look at W6610’s renovated bolt on that string. Good Luck. Anthony and Julie W6610 Ullswater

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