LATEST: Forums Technical Boom height…

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Bob Harland 1 day, 1 hour ago.

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  • #27230

    Sylvain Caro
    Participant

    Hello,

    Sylvain from France again!

    I have a small doubt has subject about the good height placement of the boom of my Mk1 GRP…

    Well on main sail must be able to be unfolded in full, but, except a question of comfort, until what minimal height can we lower boom?

    For example, there is a place where the rail which allows to cross the boltrope of main sail widens to allow to insert the boltrope of big veil there. the groove widens to allow the mainsail luff to be fed in. Has one to place boom above, or below this flaring?

    I had not asked myself the question so far, and it is by seeing diverse photos of Wayfarer with positionings vary that I ask myself this question!

    Thank you!

    Sylvain

    #27310

    davdor7038
    Participant

    Hello Sylvain, I suspect from your question that you have an adjustable gooseneck (device which fits in the mast slot and has a fitting to go into the boom).

    There is another website available which is full of useful Wayfarer information called “The Wayfarer Institute of Technology”

    In here, the “Class Rules” which govern the measurements of the boat and how to set it up for best efficiency and how to sail the Wayfarer most efficiently are available. There is lots of other really useful information for both cruisers and racers.

    The dimensions of the sails on a Wayfarer are limited by the information given in The Class Rules by the use of sail limit bands. For racing, the sails, when fully hoisted, must be inside the inner edges of Sail Band Limit 1, 3 and 4.

    Rule 26.6 gives the dimensions for the mast. It gives locations for 3 sail limit bands. These bands are used to limit the maximum size of the sails for racing. Once you have determined the exact location of the bands, the bands can be defined by using sticky electrical tape or even painting them onto the mast.

    (a) Band No 1 with its upper edge 707 +/- 3 (2’3.13/16” +/- 1/8”) above the centre of pivot hole in mast.
    What this means in practice is that the mainsail foot should not extend below the upper edge of Band No 1 when the sail is fully hoisted. (for racing). So the top of your boom/bottom of your mainsail would be at the same height as the upper edge of sail band limit No 1.

    (b) Band No 2 with its lower edge 4949 +/- 7 (16’2.13/16” +/- ¼”) above the centre of pivot hole in mast.
    This gives the maximum height for the attachment of the forestay and jib luff on the mast.

    (c) Band No 3 with its lower edge not more than 5868 (19’3”) above the upper edge of Band No 1.
    This gives the maximum height that the top of the sail is allowed to be when fully hoisted The top of the sail must not extend above the lower edge of the sail band.

    The Boom also has a sail band limit
    27.3 Sail limit band No 4. Of distinctive colour not less than 7 (¼”) wide. Shall be marked on the boom with
    its inner edge not more than 3023 (9’11”) from the aft edge of the mast and track when in position on gooseneck.

    These sail band limits are really only for racing purposes, to ensure that everyone is using a similar size sail area. If you are cruising only, you can have sails any size you like but if you are getting new sails made by a sailmaker who isn’t familiar with the Wayfarer, the sail band limits and the other information available in “The Wayfarer Institute of Technology” website will give a guide to them.

    Hope this is of some use to you. Keep asking questions if you aren’t sure.

    Regards davdor.

    • This reply was modified 1 day, 20 hours ago by  davdor7038.
    #27320

    Sylvain Caro
    Participant

    Hello Davdor,

    A very big thank to you for all these precious informations!!
    I’ll go at once for a reading of it…
    Best regards Sylvain

    #27328

    Bob Harland
    Participant

    In a normal setup the boom should not be so low that it is difficult for the crew to get under it when tacking or gybing.

    When sheeted in if the boom is close to the transom then there is a problem with the setup.

    Some points to watch for;

    hope that helps

    bob

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