LATEST: Forums Technical All alone in California with one hundred questions to ask, lol

This topic contains 14 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Kez 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #27594

    Damien Austin
    Participant

    I am in California USA and just acquired this Porters built 2000 Wayfarer. I have never sailed and am a complete beginner so I thought this would be a good boat to learn with. I have since discovered this may be the only Wayfarer on the west coast of the US and as such I have no support group or individuals to seek help from.

    Is there anyone here that would be willing to answer the one hundred questions I have in order to learn everything about my Wayfarer? Is it possible to get a copy of the owners manual (if one was available) just so at the very least I can understand how to set up the basic rigging?

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    Cheers, Damien

    Here are some pics of what I have (before cleaning).

     

     

     

    #27596

    Damien Austin
    Participant

    Question number one!

    In the pic below, has someone transposed the mast rigging? The pic is shown in the upright position.

    It would seem to me, the wire cable (which I think is the jib halyard) should be running on the steel roller and not the plastic roller?

    As it is set up now, there would be interference from the blue rope running vertical with the mast.

    #27597

    Kez
    Participant

    Very nice looking boat, you have chosen wisely.

    First thing to do is get a copy of the Wayfarer Book, order it from the UKWA website, about $20 plus postage. It is a goldmine of information. I can hear all the other Forum members agreeing.

    In it you will find answers to 90 of your 100 questions. The remaining 10 will be about things you are free to customise.  Most of us have our own funny arrangements for rig tensioning, kicker adjustment etc.

    Your mast looks ok. The forestay (the wire heading out the top right of your photograph) attaches at the front of the bow fitting and the fore sail halyard is the wire emerging through the sheave below the forestay. The fore sail attaches to the bow fitting behind the forestay.  The halyard will change to a polyester line on a soft eye (a loop on the end of the wire bit somewhere inside the mast which emerged at the foot of the mast through a sheave there ( one of three or five) and is pulled when hoisting sail. The soft loop comes out of the foot of the mast and is hooked on for tensioning using a Highfield lever. The polyester tail on the fore sail halyard is coiled up and stowed away once the sail us up.

    The soft rope emerging from the sheave above the forestay is the spinnaker halyard. The spinnaker flies in front of everything so it is correct that it is the top-most line emerging from the mast.

    Get that Wayfarer book!

    Mike

    #27598

    Kez
    Participant

    Apologies for any dodgy spelling (banana autocorrect) I am tapping this out on my phone sitting in my commuter train up to London.

    I would much rather be sailing my Wayfarer.

    #27599

    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    Hi Damien,

    You’ll get all the support you need here – just fire away!

    Simple answer to the specific points above – the wire halyard is as you suspected the jib halyard (technically a genoa on the Wayfarer, unless you have a cut-down sail). It’s wire because the halyard also tensions the whole rig when sailing, and ‘rope’ might not be strong enough.

    The blue halyard above (on the metal sheave) is the spinnaker halyard, which needs to be above the genoa halyard because the spinnaker is flown outside the genoa and the forestay. The fact that the sheaves are made from different materials isn’t a concern.

    The ring on the triangular plate between the two halyard sheave boxes is for the forestay to attach to the mast. The forestay leads down to the bow fitting and holds the mast up (in conjunction with the two shrouds) when the sails are down. When the sails are up, the wire in the leading edge of the genoa or jib takes over the role of supporting the mast, and in fact should be tight enough to make the shrouds feel really taut, and even introduce some slight bend into the mast.

    I’m getting ahead of myself – welcome and keep the questions coming. The Wayfarer is a great boat and there’s loads of support out there. There is also a US Wayfarer Association – http://www.uswayfarer.org/

    There is also a book, called (imaginatively) The Wayfarer Book, which is available from the UKWA online shop linked here, which I think would answer some of your questions.

    Good luck with your boat!

    P.S. – sorry for the overlap of this response with Mike’s – I think I was seeing a cached version of the site

    #27602

    Damien Austin
    Participant

    Gentleman,

    Thank you for the above information, it is very much appreciated and makes total sense once it is explained.

    Yes, I have placed an order for the book.

    I have the three sheave mast.

    Which rope should be running through that stationary guide, the one that the currently has the white coloured genoa rope?

     

     

    #27605

    Damien Austin
    Participant

    Below is a pic of the bow fitting.

    Would the forestay connect to the most forward cleat, the one with the blue rope attached? and why would there be a Harken roller stuffed in there?

    #27607

    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    The ‘stationary guide’ is the attachment point for the bottom of the kicker/kicking strap/vang. (The other end will be attached to the underside of the boom about a yard/metre behind the mast.)

    The bow fittings in the photo are not set up as I would have done, but I know that the forestay is often attached to the eye with the blue line attached (in your photo), as you say. I’m guessing this blue line is the painter?

    There seem to be too many fittings! My best guess is that the large bottle screw was for the lower end of the foresail luff wire, the stainless steel shackle might have been used for the forestay (instead of the eye below it), and the galvanised shackle with block might have been used to raise and lower the mast, using the forestay led back to the cockpit through the block?

    Personally, depending on intended use (cruising, racing, trailer-sailing) I would remove the shackle and block altogether. Then I would investigate whether the bottle-screw was introduced because the foresail luff wire + halyard are a bit too short to reach the Highfield lever (in its current position). Ultimately I would get rid of the bottle-screw and attach the foresail either directly to the bow fitting or (ideally) to a furling drum as part of a genoa reefing system. This may require moving the Highfield lever or even replacing the halyard with a slightly longer one…

    #27610

    Damien Austin
    Participant

    Stationary guide is for the vang setup…got it!

    Yes that blue line is a painter tied off to the trailer.

    I have removed the block assembly and will leave the shackle and bottle-screw in place for the time being until I raise the mast to see what is needed and what is not.

    Intended use is trailer sailing.

    Not sure what a Highfield lever is ? I did look at a picture online to see what it looks like but I do not appear to have one?

    #27611

    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    You might have a ‘muscle box’ instead of a Highfield lever? Sounds like a euphemism…

    #27615

    Damien Austin
    Participant

    hmm…a muscle box or a Highfield seem to be hiding from me.

    Do these pics tell a story?

     

    #27616

    Dave Barker
    Keymaster

    The most likely mounting points would be the top of the centreboard case or the rear-facing side of the mast below the goose-neck, i.e. a foot or two above the bottom  of the mast.

    Their apparent absence might explain the bottle-screw with wing-nut on the bow fitting – a desperate attempt to introduce some rig tension. You’ll need a better way than that to tension the rig. A Highfield lever is more than adequate, a muscle box is slightly easier to use and finely adjust.

    #27617

    Kez
    Participant

    Hi Damien.

     

    Good advice from Dave, get rid of all that tatt on the bow-fitting (especially the bottle-screw) and start again.

    I have my fore stay attached to that eye that has a blue rope/painter at present on your Wayfarer.  It attaches with a lanyard, that means the fore stay is a few inches short and a thin piece of good line, Dyneema or Spectra, run through the eye on the end of the forestry and the bow fitting a few times and tied off, I tighten it after the genoa halyard has been tensioned to take out the slack. My painter is tied through the first pair of holes on the bow plate although I would like to do something tidier one day.

    If you have a Highfield Lever it will be on the mast, just under the gooseneck.  I can’t see anything in your latest photographs that look like a muscle box or cascade which would be on the centreboard casing if either were there.  No doubt you have online chandlers over there but if you browse through Pinell & Bax Website you would find some pictures of a Highfield Lever.

    Best thing to do is wait for that book to arrive, most of your answers are in there.

     

    Mike

     

    #27619

    Damien Austin
    Participant

    Thanks Mike, that’s all good stuff to know and yes I will clean up the bow fitting and do it right.

    Here is a pic of the mast showing the gooseneck area.

    #27620

    Kez
    Participant

    Nope, no Highfield Lever there, although there are a couple of blocks on the mast that are a bit…. unusual.

    The previous owner clearly made a few additions, or maybe we should say he solved problems in an unconventional way.  I would like to reassure you that the Wayfarer is a very simple dinghy to rig and once you have cleared away the bits that don’t seem to belong it will be easy to see what you need to do.

    I promise you the Wayfarer Book will make this all very straightforward.

    Mike

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