Latest News: Forums Technical Rudder stock Reply To: Rudder stock

#8235
Swiebertje
Participant

New boats use an aluminium “CeeVee” stock available through most chandlers. If you prefer a classic wooden stock, it took me half an hour to saw the four pieces from a nice piece of mahogany coated ply wood, including filing and sanding. If you get the drawing from Sarah, our class secretary, the job is remarkably easy provided you have a power jig saw.

I copied the drawing on to the wood with a needle and cut the pieces with my jig saw. A half round rasp and file took the rough edges from the saw away and a bit of sand paper finished the job. The pieces were then glued together using wooden pegs and blind holes to to prevent the parts from slipping while the glue cured (under pressure). Before the final piece was glued, the down haul channel and all other surfaces on the inside that are hard to get to once the stock is assembled, were coated with two layers of two pot varnish. (see pic.)

Because I used 18 mm ply instead of 17 mm I had to sink the old gudgeon and pintle a little in to the wood with a small chisel (see pic.) but other then that all old hardware was easily moved to the new rudder stock. All screws holes were drilled first using the old stock as a template.

The extra 1 mm width in the middle turned out to be a blessing after I coated the rudder with glass and epoxy. It is a job that does not require much skill or experience. I think anyone who can handle a power jig saw can do it. Here is the end result after final sanding and a few coats of varnish:

It is now much stronger then the original which was made of mahogany planks rather then plywood. It had burst along the grain on both sides. The screws apparently worked like wedges and over time the wood burst from screw hole to screw hole. That can never happen with plywood.

Of course you can also order a ready made one from Porter’s.